Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Mar 12, 2010
Mass Effect 2 creates a well realized world that feels alive, even when we're not playing, by using only words.

Codices are nothing new in games. In fact, they’re quite old. They’re an effective tool of world building, allowing developers to explain traditions, cultures, technology, or other facts that would seem extraneous if forced into the main story. However, in Mass Effect 2, the codex is more than just a tome of fictionalized history. Such “extra information” is used to bring the world to life as well as to describe it.


Mass Effect 2 has an extensive codex, covering all the usual facts, but the actual sub-page on the main menu labeled “Codex” is just one part of a much larger well of extra information.


Tagged as: mass effect 2
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Mar 8, 2010
A salute to the games whose time commitments usually exceed a 40-hour work week.

Like comfort food, some video games seem made for winter. Not necessarily the season, but those situations like when a blizzard dumps 15 inches of snow in your city, forcing you into full-on hermit mode.


About 20 years ago, a game called Dragon Warrior forced NES-loving players to make a time commitment that far surpassed the usual hour or so that was required to beat Super Mario Bros.. The game required players to log in hours of time, traveling short distances in a huge world. The more you traveled, the stronger you got, the further you could travel. For a console game, Dragon Warrior was one of those games where a user could easily log in 20 hours before completion. It was a game that could only be completed during a long winter vacation stretch (or a summer vacation with a broken arm).


About ten years ago, the Nintendo 64 released its installment of the Zelda series, The Ocarina of Time. While technically not a role-playing game (the game was fairly linear in what you could accomplish), the game was a lush, beautiful masterpiece. For a college student with some time to kill, the first play through Ocarina was a great distraction between the Super Bowl and March Madness.


Of course, games (not including PC games) have only gotten more involved and required more out their players since the days of NES and N64. Perhaps no company has proven this more than Bethesda. Its Elder Scrolls series, first with Morrowind and later with Oblivion, had an almost overwhelming amount of paths for players to take. Not only was the primary quest a huge undertaking (players could assume that it would literally take days to get their character to a level where an instant death encounter with an adversary could be avoided), but smaller tasks like gathering various ingredients throughout the vast worlds to create a potion (finding out the mixture without a guide – well, some people have more patience than others) could guarantee an easy 40 to 60 hour time commitment.


Whether this time commitment is a worthy investment is subjective. But if you are looking for how these winter-killing games operate, look no further than Fallout 3, another Bethesda game. The first few hours (when your armor/strength is at its lowest) are almost maddeningly frustrating. You get bored, you try to venture further out into the game’s world where you meet a near instantaneous death. But as you slowly build up your power levels, you begin to get more engaged in the story. Upon hearing that I had just purchased Fallout 3, a coworker said that my social life would be almost non-existent for about two months.


This year it looks like the winter-killing game of the year is BioWare’s Mass Effect 2. Unlike Bethesda’s massive worlds of Oblivion and Fallout 3, Mass Effect‘s gameplay is much kinder in the instant gratification department. The game boasts a well-written storyline with a stellar voice talent team. The mix works so well that, like Avatar, you tend to forgive the fact that you’ve seen the central story played out dozens of times before in movies, books, and other video games. Upon finishing Mass Effect 2, I glanced at the final save log. Estimated time of play: 41 hours.


Games like Call of Duty and Halo have been criticized for their relatively short “main missions.” Pay no mind that almost a decade ago, a game that would take eight hours to complete was considered a lengthy game. Socially, these “winter killer” games definitely have their adverse effects. One month of Mass Effect 2 has made me five pounds pudgier and more sleep-deprived than normal. But these games can be viewed like that 900-page copy of Don Dellilo’s Underworld or that third attempt to finish The Lord of the Rings novels. It’s an undertaking that just seems appropriate for the months that force us inside. And though winter is coming to an end, I’m secretly hoping for one last blizzard so that I can finally get to level 20 on Fallout 3.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Mar 5, 2010
We're not players in Heavy Rain so much as we are actors. We're meant to assume the roles of these characters, to think like them, and the controversial controls reflect that desire.

Michael Abbott of The Brainy Gamer recently played Heavy Rain, and had some interesting criticisms of it:


Heavy Rain situates a system between the player and the game that heavily mediates the player’s experience…It wants to immerse me in a realistic, character-driven story with detailed environments and atmospherics; but it also wants me to remain outside that experience, ever-vigilant for the next quick-response button-press. (Heavy Rain, Brainy Gamer, 24 February 2010)


It’s a common criticism of the game and one that I couldn’t disagree with more.


Tagged as: heavy rain
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Feb 26, 2010
A warning screen appears when you first start Silent Hill: Shattered Memories that states “This game plays you as much as you play it.” This is a warning not to be taken lightly.

This discussion of Silent Hill: Shattered Memories does contain spoilers.


Silent Hill: Shattered Memories is a complete departure from the traditional survival horror format. It’s not simply a reimagining of the original Silent Hill. It’s a wholly new game. However, despite the differences, it keeps the single most important facet of the Silent Hill franchise intact, the very facet that its predecessor, Homecoming, forgot: retaining the psychological in psychological horror.


 


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Feb 19, 2010
Despite popular opinion, I don't think any kind of spoiler can truly ruin your experience with any game.

Before I ever started playing the original No More Heroes I knew all that it had to offer. I knew it was one giant joke, a playful jab at the entire medium and those who love it. I knew about the purposefully empty open world, that Travis Touchdown was a blatant otaku, that he fought with a “beam” saber, and that he was a parody of the stereotypical gamer. I knew about the over-the-top action, the insane bosses, and the game’s embrace of a retro 8-bit style. I thought it sounded awesome and expected to enjoy it, but I hated it. I hated the jokes, I hated Travis, I hated the side jobs, the open world, the Lucha Libre masks, and grinding for cash.


I’ve often wondered what made me hate the game so strongly in those first few hours, and I believe I hated it because the game was spoiled for me. Much of the game’s charm stems from the joy of discovery. Not “discovery” as in environmental exploration but rather the discovery of an unexpected gem of a game. That experience was spoiled for me by the expectations that I had going in. Most talk of spoilers center around plot twists but even a discussion of the experience can spoil a game. And yet, after the wonderfully anti-climatic battle with Letz Shake, I started to warm to No More Heroes. By the time that I heard that robotic voice announce my impending fight with Harvey Moiseiwitsch Volodarskii, I was enjoying myself. And by the time I finished the game, its crazy charm had made me a fan. Despite that joy of discovery being taken away from me, despite all the hate I had for the game, I still came to love it, and I believe that speaks to just how inconsequential any kind of spoiler is to video games.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.