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Thursday, Jul 24, 2008
Words and Pictures by Thomas Hauner.

Under fading skies, and in front of a casual yet receptive crowd, the Robert Glasper trio produced music that was both visceral and exuberant. It was just the chill, hip-hop associated jazz to cool a hot summer city night. Beginning with straight-up versions of songs from Glasper’s 2007 release In My Element, the group quickly developed into harmonious yet deconstructive musical tangents, each player part of a harmonious polyrhythmic dialogue.


The trio (Vincente Archer and Chris Dave backed Glasper on bass and drums respectively) dispensed smiles and head bobbing with each stylistic morph. During the fading denouement of “F.T.B” Glasper demurely faded into “My Favorite Things” before toying with “Scarborough Fair” on his way to the end. The melancholic, “Maiden Voyage / Everything In Its Right Place” featured more of Chris Dave’s rhythmically precise percussion volatility, dynamic hi-hat flurry, and sizzling rides.



Overall it was the trio’s grace, timing, dynamics, communication, and funky beats that captivated the audience, young and old alike.



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Friday, Jul 11, 2008
by Roman Kuebler
When the band announced that they were headed into the studio to begin work on their new record, having soldiered through personnel changes and struggles at their label, Lookout Records, it seemed like an excellent time to catch up and to allow them to speak for themselves by cataloging the happenings. Entries One through Four focused on the band in studio, laboring with overdubs and trying to catching lightning in a bottle, or at least on 2" tape. Entry Five has Oranges Band frontman Roman Kuebler exploring why exactly albums take so long to make, or at least why this album is taking so long. -- Jon Langmead


WHAT THE… ?!!


Alright seriously, why in the hell does this take so long? I mean writing, rehearsal, recording, mixing… it all takes a long time and I can’t figure out exactly why. Well, I guess I know but only because I do it. I think it’s me… drrf!?!


We started recording this album in late January. Aaaaand, that was five months ago. The only thing that is slightly more embarrassing than having only finished seven songs in that amount of time, is that this is just my fifth blog entry. Thanks to all the PopMatters readers and writers for being especially patient. But wait, why DOES this take so long?


Being in a semi-professional rock band is a full time hustle. Anyone out there drumming up shows and tours and trying to make albums and sell them knows that we are very tiny fish in a very large sea. Making ends meet as a band is difficult, well, I don’t know how difficult it is because, see, I have a job. I have always had jobs since I was 12 and started my paper route. I have been doing a lot of freelance and temporary jobs over the years to keep free enough so that when it’s time to get in the van… I can get in the van. Thing about doing temp jobs though is that when there is work you had better do it, cause it might not be there tomorrow. Anyways, reason (excuse) number one is… my work was, like, totally busy. I build architectural models for a living, and yes, it is an awesome job. Every once in a while though, for a couple weeks or sometimes a month or so, you can do nothing else. That’s the job. So for me this year, those months were April and May. Luckily, I get paid by the hour.


Somehow, somewhere in my life, i turned into a critical freak. I have always considered myself a reasonably laid back guy, but I think I might be wrong about that because I seem to be able to find fault with almost anything… anything I do that is. I am a little more lenient with other folks, though Dave might not agree (so don’t ask). Reason (excuse) two is… it takes me four hours to do one crappy lead vocal take. I don’t know how long Axl Rose takes, but it can’t be much longer than that.


Speaking earlier of being small fish in a large sea, we are not currently “enlabeled”. Our last record fulfilled our contract with our then label, Lookout Records. Since then we have been adrift in the sea of bands and music and albums and all that. It is a curious and uncertain place to be, but the upside is that no one is nagging at us about finishing this record. Wait, is that good or bad. I mean, five months?! We could certainly use a wee bit of nagging (from someone other than my father, that is) Anyways, Reason (excuse) three is… no one is knocking down our door to finish this thing.


But that is not such a bad thing. Because one thing that has been really cool about this process is that I have had opportunity to reflect and consider every stage in the process. It’s a luxury that will definitely result in a better product. I am sure of it! I mean it is a little bit torturous to constantly consider and conspire and create and re-create and tweak and change, but it seems to be for the best. Reason (excuse) four is… trust me, it’s for the best!


And instead of tweaking and considering and changing and altering this blog entry. I am just going to send it off. No pictures this time, cause what does a picture of me taking forever to do something look like? Wait, I have one of those….


Next time, guest players in the house. The all picture blog!


Roman Kuebler


Tagged as: the oranges band
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Tuesday, Jul 8, 2008
by PopMatters Staff
Pictures by Sarah Zupko / Words by Karen Zarker.

PopMatters trekked out to Fitzgerald’s annual American Music Festival to catch legendary Texas singer-songwriter Joe Ely play a smoking set with accordionist Joel Guzman. While waiting to soak up the sonic, soulful talent of Joe and Joel live—what a privilege and a pleasure—we caught a bit of traditional New Orleans jazz from the Salty Dogs and NOLA brass band music from the BS Brass Band, too. Eager to hear Ely and Guzman, we only caught part of Rosie Flores and the Pine Valley Cosmonauts, but Rosie joined Joe and Joel to perform the second encore. The stomping, shouting crowd just didn’t want to let them go.


We highly recommend this annual event held at one of Chicago area’s best music venues.


Click on image thumbnails below to view the rest of the photos.


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Monday, Jul 7, 2008
by Robin Cook

Louisville-by-way-of-NYC indie rockers Antietam flew to Austin to play four—yes, four—sets. Guitarist/singer Tara Key has branched out into solo albums, but as she explains, Antietam never broke up, even during a 10-year gap between albums. Their new album, Opus Mixtum, is now out on Carrot Top. Here, Tara provides a history of the band and her own musical influences.—Robin Cook



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Thursday, Jul 3, 2008
by Robin Cook

Originally, this was going to be an interview with just Mr. Bonebrake, but then Billy Zoom turned up. Two X members for the price of one. What luck! And what can I say about this band that hasn’t been said before? Well, for one thing, Billy Zoom is an amazing guitarist, and it’s great to see him playing again after a decade away from music. And DJ Bonebrake is a phenomenal drummer whose contributions to the band are usually overlooked. And finally, it’s an honor to interview them.—Robin Cook



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