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Thursday, Oct 23, 2008
Words and Pictures by Thomas Hauner

Singer Ebony Bones, nee Ebony Thomas, and her backup singers seemed to arrive on a direct flight from Bedrock per their Flintstones-esque outfits and oversized Wilma Flinstone necklaces. They even used empty beer bottles as percussion instruments in their opening number. In fact, everything about her and her supporting cast suggested ostentatiousness and exaggeration. Her guitarist wore some type of Indian headdress and no shirt while one of the keyboard players dressed for a masquerade ball while sporting his own oversized chain. But in trying to prove herself larger than life, Bones’ music quickly became caught up in that same fictional existence, unable to relate on an emotional level and instead serving as yet another animated dance-punk beat to get down to.


Her shtick also meant playing ringmaster to her personal circus, which involved yelling, “Make some noise New York!” every two minutes and making every instructed dance move (“move to your left…right…”) seem revolutionary.


The backing band was tight, however, allowing her to control the throttle with relative ease, quickly sending the band into its next frenzy each time. Most of the songs had some sassy theme, like “I’m Your Future Ex-Wife”, “Love & Boredom”, and “Don’tFartOnMyHeart”. But with all the gimmicks added on, it still couldn’t disguise her and her backup singers’ frail and dissonant live singing.



Tagged as: cmj, ebony bones
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Thursday, Oct 23, 2008
Words and Pictures by Thomas Hauner

If No Age had Canadian cousins they would be The Carps. The Toronto-based duo had distortion and rhythm flowing through their veins, coaxing the audience for more energy and more applause with each song. Still, the Carps were clearly the loudest in the room, Jahmal Tonge pummeling his drum kit with Neil White jumping throughout the rest of the stage with his arresting yet fluid bass.


The No Age comparison mostly ends at emotion, the decibel level, and number of members. Otherwise, The Carps are on their own. Singing soulful R&B-like melodies over underlying churning bass and bludgeoned drums, Tonge seemed to exert as much control over the group and its resulting sound as did White—an unusual thing in any band of any size. In “Compton to Scarboro”, both staged, while playing their respective instruments, a dramatic reenactment of a convenience store robbery gone awry, with White tragically falling to the stage in death. Most surprising was that the audience couldn’t keep up with The Carps’ perpetual energy and rhythm. They seemed genuinely tired. But the insatiable beat was the group’s inertia, powering them through their set like a deafening locomotive, full speed ahead, only partly slowing down to point out the sights along the way.



Tagged as: cmj, the carps
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Thursday, Oct 23, 2008
Words and Pictures by Thomas Hauner

There’s something to be said about spending over 20 minutes to set up a set of flashing L.E.D. lights for a five-song set, one that was squeezed into an already tight lineup at that. Some artists, however, rely more heavily than others on a well-crafted image and persona to present their music and themselves. The two are, in fact, symbiotic. Thus it was appropriate that Cory Nitta, producer and vocalist, had possibly the most contrived outfit imaginable while still trying to pass for exactly that: An outfit, not a costume. All spandex and Mickey & Minnie tees aside, his music matched the already contrived tone set forth by being pretty much entirely pre-recorded. Just hit play.


Adding a live drummer and guitarist to enhance his electro-pop sound was a good move. The drummer was relatively in sync with Nitta’s post-programming execution, and the guitarist’s Cornflake-crunchy distortion added a much-needed tactile layer to the sound. A backup singer also flanked Nitta onstage, but looked noticeably out of place, as if his friend had signed him up for a talent show performance he did not entirely condone. Nitta himself was the eccentric stage-personality needed to match his eccentric image and sound. He jumped all over the tiny stage, pulled at his face and was constantly immersed in flashbulbs while singing “Hey Alligator”, among other songs. All this energy led to an anticlimactic end when he realized he had already performed his last song. I guess everything wasn’t programmed ahead of time.



Tagged as: cmj, cory nitta
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Thursday, Oct 23, 2008
Words and Pictures by Thomas Hauner

Exalting to prominence by producing a catchy remix of an already catchy song is a golden strategy. Remix Kanye West’s song (“Flashing Lights”) and you’re thrust from the outer orbits of musical obscurity into the star’s own atmosphere. But Munroe is no Icarus and isn’t tempted by Kanye’s glare, instead working on his own material with a supporting guitarist and crafting a huge but definitively pop-oriented sound. He has remixed U2’s “Sunday Bloody Sunday” too, though.


Delivering power-pop with panache, Munroe played drums standing while also handling all vocal duties, occasional keyboards, and other samples and knickknacks. Strangely, he used plastic xylophone mallets the whole time (breaking one in the process) but probably in case he wanted to play his idle set of bells. His guitarist, playing both acoustic and electric, was incredibly solid and versatile, either strumming gentler phrases or singling out torrid lines. Coming together on “Will I Stay” the duo produced a surprisingly big sound with considerable scope. Munroe took to the keyboard for “I Want those Flashing Lights”, playing a solo intro and full verse before the pre-programmed verses and chorus ignited the pleased crowd.



Tagged as: cmj, colin munroe
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Thursday, Oct 23, 2008
Words and Pictures by Thomas Hauner

As soon as Nelo introduced themselves and their Austin origins it cemented my theory of what they would sound like. Now image is not everything, granted, but in music it is a lot of things. So when you look like you could be high school baseball teammates and you’re from a college town, chances are you’re going to sound like an amalgamation of the standard Big 12 conference college fraternity playlist: Blues Traveler, Bare Naked Ladies, Stone Temple Pilots and, last but not least, Dave Matthews Band.


As the six-piece eased into their laid back grooves, I couldn’t help but feel like I should be tapping a keg somewhere. The group showed some flair by adding saxophonist David Long and the lead vocalist, Reid Umstattd, seemed to alternate cues from Scott Weiland, Glen Phillips, and Eddie Vedder. The band was mostly listless on stage, needing at least four songs before showing any emotion. It was an opening slot, and they did profess a love of beer, but still, it’s your first gig in the Big Apple, make something of it!


Sounding very much like “Southern Cross” on their last song, the group could easily follow down the career path of successful alt-country rockers like Pat McGee. But their lack of bite and preference for easy smiles may just make them a West Texas name.



Tagged as: cmj, nelo
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