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by Paul Hiebert

9 Feb 2010


Rodeo - New York City, 1954

Rodeo - New York City, 1954 / Photograph © Robert Frank, from The Americans

Robert Frank’s America is a tough America. Of all the people depicted in the 83 photographs comprising Frank’s The Americans, only a few smile. Most people have empty expressions while they gaze into a bleak future. They are neither dreaming nor pondering. The small number of those devoted to evading a dreary fate either grimace or scowl. They are defiant.

Despite the diversity of Frank’s subjects—old or young, rich or poor, beautiful or ugly, rural or urban, gay or straight, black or white—all represent the stars and stripes. And what are Americans seeking? Freedom, presumably. Their austere posture is aimed at a life that promises more than it delivers. Frank travels across America trying to capture the moment when the naivety of each individual cracks and a flood of hard sadness comes gushing through.

Since the Metropolitan Museum’s exhibit of Frank’s photography is arranged to unfold in a specific order, the initial photograph sets the tone. It is entitled Parade—Hoboken, New Jersey, but we see no parade, no joy, no celebration, no destination. All we see is a brick building with two people looking out of their respective windows. The woman in the left window is partly obscured by the shade of a lowered blind, while the face of the person in the right window is completely covered by an American flag attached to a pole and flapping in the wind. It’s eerie: There is something ominous about an American flag—a widely recognized symbol of freedom—erasing the existence of an individual.

by Dave MacIntyre

8 Feb 2010


Illinois rockers Cheap Trick stormed the stage at Toronto’s Sound Academy Thursday night, putting to rest any doubts that there’s life after 50.  The Rockford quartet—consisting of front man Robin Zander (lead vocals and guitar), Rick Nielsen (lead guitar and backing vocals), Tom Petersson (12 string bass and backing vocals) and Bun E. Carlos (drums)—put on a show packed with more zeal than most artists half their age can summon.  Visually the band is stunning, donning rock star duds and flashy instruments, but it’s the crowd interaction (handled by crowd pleaser Nielsen) and their musical talent that clearly illustrates how they’ve managed to still be relevant after 35 years.  The mostly 40-plus crowd was treated to songs spanning Cheap Trick’s long discography, including “Miracle”, iconic hit “I Want You To Want Me”, and “Baby Likes To Rock”.  Between songs Nielsen would reminisce and share hilarious stories of gigs past, making self-deprecating quips about their old age.  At one point he revealed what looked like a Cheap Trick banner, adding he “should use it as a diaper” now.  More songs followed including the Elvis cover “Don’t Be Cruel”, “Ghost Town” and lady-killer “The Flame”.  When Nielsen wasn’t swapping one crazy looking guitar for another he was showering the audience with dozens of guitar picks, while Zander demonstrated he could still hit all the high notes.  Petersson’s skill on the 12-string bass was impressive as was Carlos’ tight drumming.  The encore performance started a few minutes after the band left stage when Nielsen stepped out and asked “Do you mind if we play some more?” Naturally he was answered by enthusiastic applause and whistling.  The encore was furious and the fans responded with renewed vigour to versions of “Dream Police”, “Auf Wiedersehen”, and “He’s A Whore” before the lights went out for the second and final time.  With rock-solid performances such as this and a massive insatiable fan base, I don’t foresee Cheap Trick slowing down anytime soon.

by Dave MacIntyre

5 Feb 2010


Blue Rodeo has always been one of those bands I find difficult to lump into any one genre.  They are definitely country.  Certainly rock and roll.  And you could rightfully argue they are a blues band too.  No matter what you choose to categorize them as, Jim Cuddy and Greg Keelor are still going strong and doing their best work on stage.  Even in a venue the size of Massey Hall, and surrounded in a sea of other musicians (I counted 13 on the stage at one point), the duo managed to create the atmosphere and intimacy of a saloon gig.

by Zach Schwartz

4 Feb 2010


Of Montreal drummer Jamey Huggins’ side project “James Husband” opened the show, with several other Of Montreal members helping him out. The sold out crowd was into it, but went crazy when Of Montreal started in earnest. And the show went crazy right back. I’d been warned about the theatrics that accompany an Of Montreal performance, but wasn’t completely ready for what I witnessed: a fist fight between farm animals and a lion (the lion won), a feather cannon, and the crucifixion of Kevin Barnes, just to name a few. Oh, and the music was good too. Truly, surprisingly gritty, re-imagined versions of Of Montreal favorites kept people interested, and left me liking their music more than I had when I got there. The night ended with a seemingly unanimous sing-along of the Jackson 5’s “I Want You Back”, and everyone picking feathers out of their hair.

Words and Pictures by Zach Schwartz

by Chris Catania

4 Feb 2010


Bands all have their own personal motivations for putting on great shows.  Some are looking to give the fans what they want or deserve while some bands play with abandon, hoping to celebrate one last time and drain their instruments of every last note and chord in order to clear the slate for the next chapter of their career.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Searching for Wholesome Online Fun: LDS Gamers

// Moving Pixels

"While being skeptical about the Church ever officially endorsing video games, LDS gamers remains hopeful about the future, knowing that Mormon society is slowly growing to appreciate gaming.

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