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Sunday, Mar 22, 2009
Photos: James Edward Crittendon
Frank Turner

Frank Turner


Jail Guitar Doors is an organization that seeks to provide instruments to anyone using music as part of prisoner rehabilitation. As far as their showcase went, it was both an enjoyable and frustrating night. The frustration came from a super-chatty Friday night crowd, who completely drowned out Howard Elliott Payne and an admittedly tired Ed Harcourt. Others fared better. Otis Gibbs‘s strong voice always projects, so he had no trouble. Neither did Hey Negrita!, who were fantastic fun with their blend of traditional- and skiffle-touched songs. Beans on Toast will stay in people’s memories as well. Short, standing on a chair, and playing a child-size guitar, the gravel-voiced Beans on Toast led the crowd through several riotous songs of questionable taste about things like cocaine addiction. Frank Turner closed out the show, but ran up against the show’s time limit. His solution? Take it outside. With the crowd following, he and Beans on Toast finished up the show as a crowd of curious passersby joined the throng.


Otis Gibbs

Otis Gibbs


Hey Negrita!

Hey Negrita!


Beans on Toast

Beans on Toast


Frank Turner

Frank Turner


Frank Turner and Beans on Toast

Frank Turner and Beans on Toast


 


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Sunday, Mar 22, 2009
Photos: Jennifer Kelly

Chris Woodhouse’s (from the FM Knives) new band is harder, faster, and louder than the old one, a screeching, hurling, spastic menace of a band that gets what has been a fairly sedate crowd, up to now, slamming in the pit. One guy even hazards a crowd surf, though it doesn’t last long. Neither do the songs, but while they’re on, they’re insanely aggressive, body-blowing onslaughts. More Mayyors, please.


 


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Sunday, Mar 22, 2009
Photos: James Edward Crittendon

Alela Diane is starting to generate some buzz for her crystal-clear voice and country-tinged songs. Technical problems got the show off to a slow start, but she and her group recovered quickly to deliver a set clearly influenced by West Coast country and soft rock. Their cover of Fleetwood Mac’s “Gold Dust Woman” sealed those influences if there were ever any doubt in listener’s minds. Visually, the band gives off a little bit of West Coast hippy vibe, anyway, with several band members looking like they might have stepped out of an early ‘70s incarnation of Neil Young’s band. The harmonies were excellent, well-suited to the dreamy country lope that the band seemed to favor. I’d heard Diane compared to Caitlyn Cary, which doesn’t really fit. Nevertheless, she’s worth keeping an eye on.


 


 


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Sunday, Mar 22, 2009

Southeast Engine are riding some buzz from their really interesting blend of alt-country sounds, religious imagery, and hints of spookiness. For a showcasing band in the coveted midnight spot, Southeast Engine doesn’t completely have the stage presence down yet (although this was probably hampered by the venue’s tight stage confines), and vocalist Adam Remnant goes into this “I’m in a place far away” mode that sometimes recalls Wovenhand’s David Eugene Edwards. As they offered up songs populated by mysterious women, ghosts, and various temptations and regrets, the band definitely got some speed going by the end of the night.


 


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Saturday, Mar 21, 2009

I suppose dance clubs are the natural home for the Rosebuds now, since their last two albums have fully embraced dance beats and bass-heavy songs. The bottom end-heavy mix at the Parish wasn’t doing them many favors, though, obscuring many of the vocals and nuances of the songs. Still, it’s hard to deny the show’s obvious energy, as a capacity crowd sang along and danced to the band’s set.


 


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