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by Rory O'Connor

3 Feb 2010

It may seem like a strange thing to say about a band that strictly plays cover songs, but Nouvelle Vague has found their niche.  But then, Nouvelle Vague are a far cry from the visions typically connoted by the words “cover band”.  If their three studio albums and international touring didn’t already solidify that fact, then one only needed to be present at Chicago’s Lincoln Hall Friday night listening to the crowd demand their second encore.

by Dave MacIntyre

3 Feb 2010

With temperatures hovering around minus 20 degrees Celsius, Thursday was the perfect evening to stay home under blankets, on the couch, watching a movie and sipping hot chocolate.  But Toronto does love live music and when one of the night’s performers happens to be local talent Barzin, its well worth it to bundle up and brave the elements.  The opening act of a three-band sold out bill, Barzin (playing acoustic guitar) treated fans to his special blend of melancholy folk-music supported by Nick Zubeck on electric guitar, Marshal Bureau on drums, Darren Wall on bass and Terri Parker on keys.  The saturating red glow of the Drake Hotel’s custom stage lighting created a mellow ambience to the dreamy fluidity of “Let’s Go Driving” and “Past All Concerns”.  Sitting and listening, it was easy to block out background conversation and get lost in the heart-felt sadness that Barzin’s voice so easily conveys.  The band also performed newer material such as “Queen Jane” from the 2009 release Notes To An Absent Lover.  A highlight performance of Leonard Cohen’s “Dance Me To The End Of Love” and “Just More Drugs” ended the set.  A more personal highlight moment was actually meeting Barzin on my way out.  One on one, he is soft-spoken, friendly and genuine, further convincing me that his stage persona and the emotion in the music he writes are completely authentic.

by Rachel Balik

3 Feb 2010

Tommy Tavern’s is an anomaly in Greenpoint, a neighborhood gentrifying faster than you can say “is the G train running this weekend?”  It’s more dive bar than you’ll find almost anywhere; the kind of place where your vodka tonic is a glass of rubbing alcohol topped with a splash of stale sugar water.  Two dollar Schaffer’s are the house specialty and the only thing in the place that has been replaced or cleaned in the last decade is a shiny digital juke box, which spews Bon Jovi, Phil Collins, and if you’re lucky, Queen.  At the back of the bar is a door that could lead to a closet but instead opens into a amorphous room painted in haphazard crimson.  Inside is the bar’s bathroom, and a “stage”.  When I entered, the lead guitarist of the night’s headliner, Pop. 1280, was collecting money at the door.  The vibe in the room was pretension-free.  Everyone was just waiting for the music, noticing little else.

by Thomas Hauner

27 Jan 2010

Before Danes Oh No Ono took the stage, the Mercury Lounge capacity crowd was treated to a sporadic set by Brooklyn locals ArpLine.  Their electronica sound, regularly augmented by guitars and other live instruments, had the bouncy qualities of Javelin but lacked the complimentary zeal.  They came out flat, unable to register a single melody in my head.

by Sachyn Mital

26 Jan 2010

826NYC, otherwise known as the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co, is a non-profit center that encourages children to develop their creative writing skills.  It is also a brainchild of Dave Eggers, acclaimed author of A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, What is the What, and, most recently, the screenplay and novelized versions of Where the Wild Things Are.  As it happens, Eggers also happens to frequent a celebrity circle, which allows him to bring talented comedians (John Oliver, Eugene Mirman), musicians (David Byrne, Sufjan Stevens) or actors to 826 benefits as was the case of the present Ping-Pong charity event.  SPiN New York, an extremely chic table tennis club in Manhattan was the latest benefit venue where Eggers, along with author Sarah Vowell, the Times crosswords editor Will Shortz and actors, David Schwimmer, Peter Sarsgaard, Catherine Keener, and Mike Meyers, played some ping pong.  And I don’t want to forget New York Ranger Sean Avery or chef Mario Batali either.  For those Regular Joes, you could raise money for a chance to play against a celebrity or make a smaller contribution to come in and watch.

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: Executing 'The Deed'

// Moving Pixels

"It's just so easy to kill someone in a video game that it's surprising when a game makes murder difficult.

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