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by Thomas Hauner

18 Aug 2009

by Thomas Hauner

11 Aug 2009

African music, both traditional and contemporary, seems to be having a moment this summer in New York City. Artists like Oumou Sanger, Rokia Traore, Asa, Amadou and Mariam, and Tinariwen have enlightened ears with stunning cultural cadences. And this past week while ivy leaguers Vampire Weekend emulated West African guitars for rain-soaked teens at All Points West, virtuosos Béla Fleck and Toumani Diabaté played to a decidedly more traditional, and erudite, crowd. They came not only for the hour of acoustic duets between Fleck’s banjo and Diabaté’s kora, but also to view Throw Down Your Heart, a documentary (directed by Fleck’s half-brother Sascha Paladino) about Fleck’s 2005 journey to Africa tracing the banjo’s musical roots.

by Steve Horowitz

10 Aug 2009

On the third day, Wanderlust rocked. The Sunday line-up offered a tasty array of alternative bands that generally seemed pleased to perform in such a beautiful and natural setting. The sun shone more mercifully than it had on the previous day at the mountainous Squaw Value resort near Lake Tahoe, and the gorgeous weather helped lift everyone’s spirits.

The Honey Brothers opened the Sunday activities around 12:30 pm with a mix of everything from goofy ukulele and banjo pop tunes to more serious, angular electric guitar-based music. The acting fame of drummer Adrian Grenier (HBO’s Entourage) drew many people to attend the day’s first show, but the band transcended its novelty act status through the strength of its performance.

The combination of silly songs and powerful rock kept the crowd intrigued, especially when ex-Dresden Doll Amanda Palmer joined the group on a wacked out performance of Queen’s “We are the Champions”. Palmer loudly reached for notes she couldn’t quite hit but wouldn’t stop trying to in a pretense of desperation as the band smiled and played.

Palmer’s solo set provided the highlight of the festival. She sang many of her best known compositions, including “Coin-Operated Boy” and “House That I Grew Up In”, as well as inspired covers. She opened with a simple and lovely version of Bright Eyes’ “Lua”, and accompanied herself on ukulele while her keyboards went through emergency repair. She later offered a stately version of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” that showcased the grand melodrama of the lyrics and piano music.

Palmer engaged the crowd with between song patter as well as introducing her material to those who might not be familiar with her work. She commented on the pleasure of playing in front of a mountain and told stories about what she had been up to lately, which lead to a discussion of Comic-Con and Neil Gaiman. She and Gaiman had recently collaborated on a project, and she sang a somewhat bawdy tune they had written together. She ended her set in Pete Townsend like fashion by smashing her bench across the keyboards.

Maybe the problem was following such an incredible talent, or maybe it was because the band’s cellist didn’t make the plane, but the Mates of State who followed Palmer seemed to phone in its performance. Many in the crowd dispersed to get beers, go swimming in the nearby pond, or just grab some shade during the band’s set. The energy level quickly rose when Broken Social Scene hit the stage. Even before the band officially started playing, singer/guitarist Kevin Drew warned the crowd that, “This is gonna be a punk rock show.” The band rocked on all cylinders.

Singer Lisa Lobsinger joined the collective for several tunes, including a hot version of “Fire-Eyed Boy”. However, it was Drew that remained the center of attention. He told the crowd to engage in “scream therapy” and said, “It’s wonderful therapy, just like yoga” and counted to three to be hit by a loud cry in response. The yoga practitioners in the crowd weren’t sure if he was being ironic, but were caught up in the frenzy and joined in. He sincerely told the audience, “Be careful. Be safe. Fight for your right to celebrate and don’t let anyone take it away from you,” before launching into the closing number.

The strange stylings of Andrew Bird came next as he looped himself playing instruments and whistling, and then sang to the rhythms. Bird was burdened by the fact that much of his equipment did not arrive and he had to borrow stuff from Kaki King, Rogue Wave, and Broken Social Scene. In a way, this helped his performance as he became more improvisational and fed on the positive vibrations from the crowd.

Bird performed splendid acoustic fiddle and vocal versions of Delta bluesman Charley Patton’s “Some of These Days” and the old spiritual “Churnin’ Burnin’”. Bird earnestly told the audience, “This is one of the nicest festivals I have ever played,” and it was clear he was sincere.

The Austin band Spoon closed the festival, but rather than mellow out the crowd, the group got everybody re-energized. Spoon played recent favorites, such as “Isla Forever” and “You Got Yr Cherry Bomb” as if the group were performing in a sweaty, Texas club on a Saturday night instead of a beautiful retreat in the mountains on an early Sunday evening.

The quartet also offered a fast and hard version of Paul Simon’s “Peace Like a River”. The band turned the sad and lonesome tune into a battle cry against the forces that drive one into insomnia and despair. As the show ended, Spoon promised to return again next year if band was invited because the landscape and the audience were so wonderful. As is usually the case when people are having a good time, no one wanted the show to end. The crowd slowly left the venue and descended the mountain with satisfied smiles.

by Steve Horowitz

7 Aug 2009

The cofounders of the Wanderlust Festival organized the event as half music/half yoga, and attendees could buy tickets for one part or the other or both. But it does seem that Jeff Krasno and Schuyler Grant may have been more interested in the yoga than the music. The duo sponsored a meet and greet with the press during Kaki King’s set and hyped the 800-person yoga class being taught when Rogue Wave performed. The organizers also sponsored an organic gourmet dinner during Jenny Lewis’s set. Yoga adherents may have been willing to skip Lewis to feed their bodies, but music lovers would choose the redheaded songstress.

Unlike Friday, to see the music Saturday one had to take the Funitel to the Gold Coast Stage, which is well over 8,000 feet high. The 15-minute ride through the mountains in a gondola made me feel like I was going to some important destination, rather than a sandy, shadeless area with a nice view.

The steady groove of jam rock band Big Light opened the afternoon festivities to a small, but appreciative crowd at 12:30pm as the temperature began to climb into the 90s. Groups of people steadily arrived from the lifts so that by the time Kaki King played, there were large pockets of crowds dotted across the dusty basin. King, shredding her electric guitar as part of a power trio offered the most controversial and funny statements of the day, “I’ll be a hippie, but I’m not doing that barefoot dancing thing. I won’t drink the moldy water. I’m not gonna do yoga, unless you can convince me, and that would be like convincing me there is a god. I don’t think so. I guess I’ve just offended half the audience.” Some, in agreement cheered, but the reaction was mostly silent from the crowd that loudly clapped for her music.

Rogue Wave followed with their dreamy alternative indie pop and claimed to be locals because of their Oakland, CA roots. The band pandered to the yoga followers (“Namaste, that’s Yoga 101, right people,” the lead singer earnestly said. The electricity level of the crowd jumped when Gillian Welch took the stage. I overheard several people say that this was who they came for most.

David Rawlings accompanied her on guitar as the two performed a litany of her best known songs, including “Miss Ohio”, “Talking Today About Elvis”, “Time (the Revelator)”, and others. Welch, with a pale white complexion and a sleeveless, summer weight robin’s egg blue dress, played both guitar and banjo and remarked how the audience were “my people” because they cheered when she picked up her banjo. Welch offered no comments about the yoga going on, and cheered the people twirling hula hoops to mantra-like rhythms as if they were dancing to her tunes, which they were in a way.

Jenny Lewis joined Rawlings and Welch on “Didn’t Leave Nobody but the Baby”, which Welch wrote and sang with Emmylou Harris and Allison Krauss on the O Brother Where Art Thou movie soundtrack. The sweet harmonies generated a fevered response, that didn’t end even when Rawlings and Welch left the stage after a rollicking version of the country duet, “Jackson”.

Jenny Lewis was backed by a crack five-piece ensemble that also joined her for a five-part harmony on the song “Acid Tongue”. But the focus was always on the diminuitive lead singer whose small height belied her significant stature on the stage. Lewis took turns jumping and dancing besides singing and playing guitar and organ. She also conversed with the crowd. “Who’s your favorite Beatle,”  she asked. She then added, “I’m in the George camp. I think he wrote this,” and then she played the Traveling Wilbury’s “Handle With Care,” a song in which Harrison plays guitar and sings, but is most associated with Tom Petty.

Lewis joked about the yoga present. “I went up in a gondola with a bunch of people doing ‘Downward Dog’ and it was a little creepy, sexually strange if you know what I mean.”  Lewis and her band mostly played tracks from her two recent solo albums, including “Born Secular” which addresses religious issues first hand in a somewhat critical manner.

The musical highlights for me ended with Lewis, but not for many in the crowd who seemed to be there for mindless body movements, which isn’t all that different from doing yoga exercises. Common, replacing a sick Michael Franti, led the audience in exuberant call and response rap with steamy overtones.

For many, the biggest highlight was DJ Girl Talk, who inspired people to dance along with snippets of tunes like, Tag Team’s “Whoomp, There it is”, Van Halen’s “Jump”.  and Paul McCartney’s “Silly Love Songs”. The stage show used some sort of strange toilet paper blower, multi-colored confetti and oversized balls to generate excitement. The TP may have been better used elsewhere, considering the sausage grinder like quality of the dance music.

by Kirstie Shanley

6 Aug 2009

It’s impossible to be a casual Veils fan. Once you hear the sense of desperation inherent within Finn Andrews’ vocals, you’re hooked. Unlike many bands in this modern age, The Veils have no air of pretense or sense of even standard performance. It’s purer than that and much more human. It’s undeniable that The Veils are capable of composing songs that fit within an indie rock genre with remarkably memorable guitar rifts and the lovely bass playing by Sophia Burn. This is tremendously apparent in songs like “Three Sisters”, “Calliope!”, and “The Letter”. However, it’s the utter raw vulnerability of Finn Andrews that comes out more than anything when you see the band live.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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