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by David Reyneke

29 Mar 2010


Following one of the catchiest albums of 2009 Miike Snow (Andrew Wyatt, and production team, Bloodshy & Avant) served up a stellar performance Saturday night at Webster Hall.  Playing practically their entire catalog (minus my favorite, “Song For No One”), the band showed how a single album isn’t a hindrance to rocking a sold out party.  Three sold out New York City parties to be exact—Saturday being night two.

by David Reyneke

29 Mar 2010


Despite issues entering the country earlier in the month, k-os made his first New York City appearance in over three years, landing safely in the arms of the mystic le Poisson Rouge. While never truly maintaining a huge mainstream following in the States, the Canadian mic mangler had no trouble filling the downtown nightclub with die hard fans.

by Thomas Hauner

26 Mar 2010


Regina Carter played the role of reverent interpreter, anthropologist and musical diplomat Tuesday night at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, the first night of a residency in support of her forthcoming album, Reverse Thread.  The album, a new collection of African folk songs arranged by and reinterpreted for her new ensemble (also called Reverse Thread), is another excursion into new sonic frontiers, providing “the opportunity to explore and celebrate a tiny portion of music that moved me”, Carter said.  Enabled by a MacArthur fellowship to follow her muse, Carter’s Reverse Thread resonates with her confident yet lyrical tone, albeit in the refreshingly new context of the African diaspora.

by Mehan Jayasuriya

25 Mar 2010


As I was waiting for Joanna Newsom to take the stage at Washington’s Sixth & I Historic Synagogue on Tuesday night, a flock of young girls sat down next to me in the pew. While none of them seemed any older than about 10, they all looked the part of Newsom acolytes: braided hair, tie-dye t-shirts, wide-eyed excitement. Their mother explained that not only were they huge Newsom fans, they were also aspiring harpists. It was, admittedly, a somewhat peculiar sight, one that for a cynic might have served to reinforce Newsom’s reputation as a renaissance faire refugee and a magnet for the same. But to me, the troupe of pint-sized fans pointed toward something far less superficial. Through their eyes I saw Joanna Newsom as not just a talented songwriter and musical virtuoso but as something arguably more significant: a pop artist who serves as a role model for girls who aspire to be serious musicians.

by Mehan Jayasuriya

24 Mar 2010


Spoon’s live show is always a pretty safe bet. The Austin indie underdogs have been chugging along for over a decade and a half now, winning audiences over night after night with their powerhouse sets and detached cool. But how do you wow a crowd that’s come over the years to expect nothing less than consistent excellence? Spoon’s answer: surprising setlists and engaging openers. Playing tracks off of their latest LP, Be Brave, fellow Austinites The Strange Boys warmed up the crowd with a set’s worth of twangy garage pop. Up next were Deerhunter, whose swirling cathedrals of sound managed to suck in even the night’s headliners (Britt Daniel and Jim Eno could be seen on the second floor balcony for much of Deerhunter’s set, geeking out and videotaping, respectively). Finally, Britt Daniel took the stage solo for an acoustic rendition of “Me and the Bean” before being joined onstage by the rest of Spoon for a 90-minute set of taut, groove-heavy, minimalist jams that drew heavily from this year’s excellent Transference, while throwing a few bones to diehards in the form of covers and old favorites (“Jonathan Fisk” was an especially welcome surprise). There’s a reason why, when Metacritic named Spoon the best band of the last decade, no one so much as batted an eyelid: they’re the only band that manages to achieve perfection on a nightly basis without breaking a sweat.

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Moving Pixels Podcast: Our Own Points of View on 'Hardcore Henry'

// Moving Pixels

"Hardcore Henry gives us a chance to consider not how well a video game translates to film, but how well a video game point of view translates to film.

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