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by Dave MacIntyre

7 Apr 2010


Philadelphia shoegazers A Sunny Day In Glasgow played Friday night at The Garrison. I really liked the band’s recent release, Nitetime Rainbows EP, so I was anxious to hear how their moody strings and keyboards would translate live. Doors at The Garrison were scheduled to open at 8 PM. Considering I had never been to the venue and recent reviews had described it as one of Toronto’s new spots in the “hipper” west side, I arrived at 8 PM to ensure I would get a good spot to shoot from. The place was completely empty. Most of the chairs were still stacked in the corner and the screeching of guitars and mad drumming could be heard as sound check just got underway. A bartender appeared a few minutes later and informed me doors were at 9:00 PM.

by Sean Costello

7 Apr 2010


by Mehan Jayasuriya

5 Apr 2010


It’s quite remarkable, really: when they take the stage, the members of the Smith Westerns project a world-weary disinterest that performers twice their age would be hard pressed to match. Everything else about them, however, screams youthful exuberance, from their willingness to strike rock god poses (an additional spotlight that was trained on guitarist Max Kakacek was turned on only during solos) down to the magic marker ‘X’s on their hands. Barreling through a set of ramshackle garage-rock that pointed, unabashedly, toward the monsters of glam, psych and classic rock, the band made no bones about their ambitions. When someone yelled out, “Play the hits!” frontman Cullen Omori coolly snapped back, “They’re all hits”, without missing a beat.

Opening act So Cow took a very different stance toward the audience, though their lo-fi indie-pop was no less rewarding. Playing mostly tracks off of their self-titled singles collection (they also have a new full-length LP, Meaningless Friendly, out on Tic-Tac-Totally), the Irish bedroom-pop act was bouncy, engaging and tons of fun. When frontman Brian Kelly’s glasses started slipping off of his face, he unhesitatingly handed them to a girl in the front row. “Can you put these in a bag or a pocket?” he asked, politely. “Just keep them safe.”

by David Reyneke

2 Apr 2010


I had no idea what to expect walking into Le Poisson Rouge Tuesday night to see Micachu and the Shapes perform.  Would this be the musical extravaganza I had hoped, or just another unmemorable downtown Manhattan hipster sweat factory?  After Tanlines’ opening set, one began to get the feeling that it would be the latter.  While definitely holding the crowd’s attention, their routine sound didn’t do much for me.

by Thomas Hauner

1 Apr 2010


Omnipresent at CMJ last fall were the xx and their white X monogram. They played the Today show, along with countless other showcases, were the critical darlings of NME, released a universally acclaimed eponymous debut record, xx, and licensing deals flourished, like the prominent 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games AT&T ad featuring Apollo Anton Ohno—a reference overheard several times as a packed Webster Hall waited for the young Londoners to commence their first American headlining tour. Their meteoric rise has been swift—possibly even overwhelming. Former fourth member Baria Qureshi left the group shortly after CMJ.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

After Images: Poland's 41st Gdynia Film Festival

// Short Ends and Leader

"From painters to interrogators, some of the finest films at Gdynia Film Festival 2016 dramatized real-life figures from the country’s past.

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