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by Dave MacIntyre

8 Feb 2010


Illinois rockers Cheap Trick stormed the stage at Toronto’s Sound Academy Thursday night, putting to rest any doubts that there’s life after 50.  The Rockford quartet—consisting of front man Robin Zander (lead vocals and guitar), Rick Nielsen (lead guitar and backing vocals), Tom Petersson (12 string bass and backing vocals) and Bun E. Carlos (drums)—put on a show packed with more zeal than most artists half their age can summon.  Visually the band is stunning, donning rock star duds and flashy instruments, but it’s the crowd interaction (handled by crowd pleaser Nielsen) and their musical talent that clearly illustrates how they’ve managed to still be relevant after 35 years.  The mostly 40-plus crowd was treated to songs spanning Cheap Trick’s long discography, including “Miracle”, iconic hit “I Want You To Want Me”, and “Baby Likes To Rock”.  Between songs Nielsen would reminisce and share hilarious stories of gigs past, making self-deprecating quips about their old age.  At one point he revealed what looked like a Cheap Trick banner, adding he “should use it as a diaper” now.  More songs followed including the Elvis cover “Don’t Be Cruel”, “Ghost Town” and lady-killer “The Flame”.  When Nielsen wasn’t swapping one crazy looking guitar for another he was showering the audience with dozens of guitar picks, while Zander demonstrated he could still hit all the high notes.  Petersson’s skill on the 12-string bass was impressive as was Carlos’ tight drumming.  The encore performance started a few minutes after the band left stage when Nielsen stepped out and asked “Do you mind if we play some more?” Naturally he was answered by enthusiastic applause and whistling.  The encore was furious and the fans responded with renewed vigour to versions of “Dream Police”, “Auf Wiedersehen”, and “He’s A Whore” before the lights went out for the second and final time.  With rock-solid performances such as this and a massive insatiable fan base, I don’t foresee Cheap Trick slowing down anytime soon.

by Dave MacIntyre

5 Feb 2010


Blue Rodeo has always been one of those bands I find difficult to lump into any one genre.  They are definitely country.  Certainly rock and roll.  And you could rightfully argue they are a blues band too.  No matter what you choose to categorize them as, Jim Cuddy and Greg Keelor are still going strong and doing their best work on stage.  Even in a venue the size of Massey Hall, and surrounded in a sea of other musicians (I counted 13 on the stage at one point), the duo managed to create the atmosphere and intimacy of a saloon gig.

by Zach Schwartz

4 Feb 2010


Of Montreal drummer Jamey Huggins’ side project “James Husband” opened the show, with several other Of Montreal members helping him out. The sold out crowd was into it, but went crazy when Of Montreal started in earnest. And the show went crazy right back. I’d been warned about the theatrics that accompany an Of Montreal performance, but wasn’t completely ready for what I witnessed: a fist fight between farm animals and a lion (the lion won), a feather cannon, and the crucifixion of Kevin Barnes, just to name a few. Oh, and the music was good too. Truly, surprisingly gritty, re-imagined versions of Of Montreal favorites kept people interested, and left me liking their music more than I had when I got there. The night ended with a seemingly unanimous sing-along of the Jackson 5’s “I Want You Back”, and everyone picking feathers out of their hair.

Words and Pictures by Zach Schwartz

by Chris Catania

4 Feb 2010


Bands all have their own personal motivations for putting on great shows.  Some are looking to give the fans what they want or deserve while some bands play with abandon, hoping to celebrate one last time and drain their instruments of every last note and chord in order to clear the slate for the next chapter of their career.

by Vijith Assar

4 Feb 2010


There were many wonderful things about this year’s installment of the Blip Festival, the flagship annual gathering of electronica enthusiasts who write their songs using ancient video game hardware, but I’ll artificially limit myself here so we can all pretend I came up with a clever angle on this review (glomag and Psilodump, in particular, get the short end of this deal—sorry, guys). Thus, 8 Bits from Blip:

Fighter X dancing: Youngish probably-hipster dudes in tight pants and floppy hair shoveling out manic, skittering Game Boy duels. Even if they sometimes came across as a sort of sleazy fun-loving Europop compared to their fellow performers (hey, there’s a place for that stuff too), the lengthy continuous set was very impressive, as was their tendency to abandon tending to the devices and instead jump around the stage or go crowd surfing, especially given that they have such small memory banks.  The Game Boys, I mean.

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In Defense of the Infinite Universe in 'No Man's Sky'

// Moving Pixels

"The common cries of disappointment that surround No Man’s Sky stem from the exciting idea of an infinite universe clashing with the harsh reality of an infinite universe.

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