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by Dave MacIntyre

23 Jan 2010

Massachusetts alternative rockers Dinosaur Jr. proved to a sold-out Phoenix Concert Theatre that they are hardly extinct.  The band, having just performed a free show at Sonic Boom record store, blew fans away with an energy packed performance highlighted by front man J Mascis’ guitar wizardry.  Standing before a tower of Marshall amps, Mascis barely broke a sweat while coolly working a bank of effects pedals and making his guitar scream effortlessly.  Lou Barlow, who also opened the evening plucking solo heart-felt folk songs on an acoustic guitar, reappeared on bass guitar and played like a possessed man.  Unable to enter Canada, regular Dinosaur Jr. drummer Murph was replaced by Kyle Spence who’s tight work on the kit meshed into the performance beautifully.  Fans were treated to new material from off the group’s 2009 release, Farm, such as “Pieces”, “Imagination Blind”, and “I Don’t Wanna Go There”.  Older fan favorites like “Feel The Pain” and “Freak Scene” also made the cut.  The evening concluded with encore performances of “Kracked”, “Sludgefest”, and “Chunks”, during which Fucked Up vocalist Damian “Pink Eyes” Abraham joined in.  Although 2010 has just begun, I can say with certainty this show will make my top 5 list for the year.

by David Reyneke

20 Jan 2010

Voices Voices, Gaslamp Killer and Prefuse 73. Just looking at the bill knows what to expect: heavy hitting drums, plenty of bass, and tons of extras to go wild to. And with the lovely Music Hall of Williamsburg as the backdrop for this electronic fanfare, there was no doubt that this was the place to be in NYC.

by Thomas Hauner

19 Jan 2010

As far as venerated venues go, Radio City is pretty much it.  It’s the pinnacle of every tour no matter how many times it’s been conquered, bestowing a child-like exuberance to practically all those who grace its stage.  So it was for Josh Ritter who opened the evening.  Though he’s as excited and sincere as a schoolboy for nearly every show, Ritter was equally courageous by trying out half new material.  His new folk narratives (“The Curse”, “Annabelle Lee”) carried over well but “Girl in the War” remains a thing of beauty, and it instilled a quiet contemplative reverence in the crowd.

by David Reyneke

18 Jan 2010

The United Palace, a renovated 1930’s New York City movie theatre, set the majestic backdrop for Vampire Weekend’s epic hometown return. Filled with thousands of screaming teenagers and adults alike, the sold out show was positioned as the type of gig to be talked about for months. The question, however, was coming off of the release of their sophomore album, Contra, was the reception of new material going to be as welcomed as some of their debut’s classic cuts?

by Thomas Hauner

18 Jan 2010

As gale-force winds whipped rain against City Winery’s exterior, inside the night belonged to cozy hour d’oeuvres, a glass of wine and old-fashioned folk singing.  Young banjoist Sam Amidon began the night with his best song, “How Come That Blood”, but never successfully matched the charm of his initial lulling cadence paired with his raspy sonority.  The audience (including David Byrne) embraced his deadpan idiosyncrasies and cheered loudly when he saved the intonation on his third song by moving his guitar capo into the same key he was singing in.  But his offbeat allure resonated well with his rustic musings, especially when sung in his yodeler’s croak of a tenor.  Accompanied by a pianist, he harmonized with Beth Orton—whom he introduced as opening for herself—on “Sugar Baby”, ending his set on a gorgeous note.

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