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by Kirstie Shanley

6 May 2009

Adeptly skirting the line between indie pop and indie punk, Portland’s three-piece The Thermals seemed to be having as much fun as the audience at this show. There’s a visible chemistry between the band members on stage, especially Hutch Harris and Kathy Foster. This undoubtedly makes their songs sound tighter live, even when their over-amorous fans add their own volume to the mix. In fact, it was undeniable how anthemic the Thermals’ songs had become—especially to the younger members of the crowd.


by Thomas Hauner

5 May 2009

King Khan was the sovereign and the audience his court, just as one would suspect. Notorious for his stage antics and backing himself with the controlled chaos of a garage-inspired eight-piece funk outfit (his Shrines), dancing cheerleader, roller-skating geriatric hype-man, and any other member of the audience with the conviction to share the spotlight in various stages of undress, King Khan unleashed a riotous set at the Music Hall of Williamsburg. Yet, unlike my last King Khan and the Shrines experience, the result was relatively tame by comparison—and not for Mr. Khan’s lack of wanting.


by Thomas Hauner

27 Apr 2009

This night found Messieurs James Ford and Jas Shaw bringing their British brand of minimalist electronica to the Highline. Though their ascent, and hype, in the electronica scene has paralleled that of French duo Justice (they also like to remix each other and release albums on the same day while sounding completely different), they are decidedly geeky and focused in concert, eschewing the rock-star pranks the Parisians flaunt so effortlessly.


by Kevin Ott

26 Apr 2009

If Saturday, April 18th unfolded as beautifully sunny and spring-like as it did in Cincinnati, and the rest of the over 700 independent record stores in the USA were as crowded and vibrant as Shake It Records on Record Store Day, then there is good reason for optimism in the industry. By “industry”, I don’t mean the broad definition of the music industry, but instead, the small-but-no-longer-practically-obsolete corner of the world frequented by the true music junkies and ephemera aficionados—the jumbled and cramped old storefront operations that are packed with racks of CDs and vinyl, old and new, obscure and popular.


by Mehan Jayasuriya

20 Apr 2009

This past week, I spent my Easter Sunday at the Black Cat with the Wooden Birds, the latest project from American Analog Set frontman Andrew Kenny. AnAmSet fans will feel right at home with the Wooden Birds, as the band finds Kenny marrying his hushed delivery with dulcet tones and understated arrangements yet again. That’s not to say, however, that the Wooden Birds are just the American Analog Set with different players. Longtime fans will notice that Kenny’s latest vehicle favors acoustic over electric instrumentation and has a more rhythm-heavy bent (nearly every one of the band’s songs features maracas and tambourine).

//Mixed media

Accidentally Preserved Kickstarts Silents

// Short Ends and Leader

"Finally, a place where new technology meets old cinema for today's silent film fans.

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