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by Sachyn Mital

15 Oct 2015

Following an opening set from neo-soul comrade Marsha Ambrosius, the Roots took the stage at Summerstage for the final outdoor event of the long season (five months!) as part of a corporate show (so it wasn’t general admission). But it would be hard enough to find the Roots playing on the road these days, given their regular gig as the house band for Jimmy Fallon, so limiting the capacity was wise. Black Though and ?uestlove, along with “Captain” Kirk, Damon “Tuba Gooding Jr.” and their cohorts, jammed through a medley of Roots material like “The Seed 2.0” and “Respond/React” along with other hip-hop classics like “Jungle Boogie”. But it didn’t stop there. Not too long into their set, Talib Kweli came out to bust some rhymes on “Act Too (Love of My Life)” and a verse or two later, Common came out to help him. Another surprise came in the form of Cee-Lo Green (who had performed with The Roots earlier for NBC) to do a cover of Al Green’s “Love and Happiness”. Fellow Philadelphian (and also a NYC transplant), Bilal jumped in with The Roots for “The OtherSide” as well as “Back to Love”. The band’s finale was even bigger (though the interlude where their electronic wizard mashed beats and tunes from his mixer was stellar) as Salt-N-Pepa and their backup dancers took the crowd over the top with “Push It”. The Roots certainly know how to bring it and made the night a memorable “summer” finale.

by Sachyn Mital

14 Oct 2015

It’s never easy to select where to go during CMJ Music Marathon, the nearly week long event that draws hundreds of bands to New York City for a chance to play in front of industry professionals, music tastemakers, bloggers and their friends. Hopefully anyone really. Given the number of venues to choose from, I decided to hedge my bets and go to the BalconyTV Showcase at Webster Hall, an event I attended last year, so that I could also check out bands downstairs in the Studio while bands were swapping out on the former stage. Below are the acts I caught, as well as pics from Christopher Paul Stelling’s set at Rockwood as I had wanted to end my night on a strong show.

by Sachyn Mital

13 Oct 2015


The 13th Annual New York Burlesque Festival Premiere Party was held at Brooklyn Bowl on September 25th and it featured a wide variety of acts from performers from all around the world. We captured photos from the first half of the night and have them to share. But remember, while sometimes performances from burlesque dancers will tickle your fancy, sometimes they can stir up nightmares… some of the performances bordered on the supernatural while some verged on being murderous.

by Sachyn Mital

8 Oct 2015

For fans of electronic music, one of the most invigorating musicians on the scene right now is Robert DeLong. Though that may be somewhat surprising given that I was saying similar things about him two years ago. But DeLong has proved staying power despite what could have become a show that only drew an audience for its novelty. (His biggest hit so far includes the lyrics “make you fuckin’ dance” and his live performance requires the use of video game controllers.) But, returning with a new album, In the Cards, DeLong is stronger than ever.

by Sachyn Mital

7 Oct 2015

In September, New Yorkers might have caught a glimpse of Nashville-based artist Ruby Amanfu during the Neil Fest event at Bowery Ballroom. Amanfu was one of many artists performing covers of Neil Young songs as part of a benefit for Sweet Relief. Covering Young’s “For the Turnstiles”, Amanfu proved more capable of adding her own style and voice to others’ songs, which is a great incentive to listen to her new album, Standing Still, as it features mostly other musician’s works, including Brandi Carlile’s “Shadow on the Wall” (for which there is a video you can watch below), Bob Dylan’s “Not Dark Yet” (the cover she did at Dylan Fest led to the creation of this album) and Kanye West’s “Street Lights”. In fact, out of the ten songs, only the deep “I Tried” is an original.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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