Latest Blog Posts

by Sachyn Mital

9 Mar 2016


Watching Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn perform is to experience both the powerful interplay between their two different styles of banjo and to witness some hilarious banter between the married couple. Just a week or two before they were set to perform at the 92Y, Fleck and Washburn earned a Grammy award for Best Folk album for their record Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn. But they didn’t let that award go to their heads (Fleck has already won over a dozen anyways). Instead, they expressed being humbled to be performing in a space where so many great intellectuals had spoken.

As Fleck explained at one point, he plays banjo in a traditional style, similar to Earl Scruggs, by up-picking with the fingers and down-picking with his thumb. On the other hand, Washburn performs utilizing the clawhammer style (mostly down-picking) that Doc Watson was best known for. But there is no obvious impediment to performing together as the two sounded brilliant on stage. Both brought material that has previously been performed before the two began their collaboration. Early in the set they performed a classic Flecktones song, “New South Africa”, one of my live favorites for the full band, stripped down which allowed the vibrant banjo to shine. Later on, Washburn singing in Mandarin, a language she studied in college and refined abroad, performed a song that had its roots in China’s Western Sìchuān Province.

by Sachyn Mital

26 Feb 2016


Josh Ritter‘s Sermon on the Rocks is his most ebullient album to date. And, as implausibly as it sounds if you have seen him live, Ritter appears happier than ever while performing—so much so that his fans are becoming even more effusive. Rarely, if ever, have I seen the entire audience rise for an artist before his encore. But for Ritter’s homecoming (of sorts) show in New York they were up (but sat back down after) for “Getting Ready to Get Down”. Even as headlining the gorgeous Beacon Theatre was a triumphant achievement for Ritter, he calm his nerves, he told the audience he was pretending the show was in the tiny Mercury Lounge. But the deceit didn’t matter to the crowd. Many people sang along as Ritter and the Royal City Band performed a smattering of new tracks and old favorites over the 100-plus-minute set.

by Sachyn Mital

24 Feb 2016


At an American Songbook show, one should expect some backstory to the music. As Foreigner have been performing without co-founder Lou Gramm for over a decade now, the onus of sharing tidbits from the band’s history fell to Mick Jones. Jones described how the band recorded some of their songs nearby and their record label was a block or two over, above where Starbucks is now. On the other hand, Kelly Hansen, the vocalist/replacement for Gramm, shared more recent stories of the band, including an acoustic show in Europe, and ribbed Jones for forgetting to introduce him. Both were ecstatic to be playing in the Appel Room, with it’s huge windows overlooking Columbus Circle and Central Park.

by Sachyn Mital

23 Feb 2016


The Cactus Blossoms are two brothers from Minneapolis, Jack Torrey and Page Burkum, whose rich harmonies and early country sound are reminiscent of the Everly Brothers. Their voices blend into a pastiche of nostalgia but the band incorporates modern elements into their songs and stories. Just take a listen to the lyrics for “Stoplight Kisses”, the first song off their new album You’re Dreaming. People in the audience who had seen the duo before were pleased to see the addition of upright bassist Andy Carroll and drummer Chris Hepola (left-handed they noted) to the ensemble. The Cactus Blossoms’ set included a few classic covers as well as their own material. The Bowery Presents noted, “The Cactus Blossoms dipped expertly into Hank Williams (“Your Cheatin’ Heart”), Waylon Jennings (“Only Daddy That’ll Walk the Line”) and others, but let many of their own tunes carry the night, from “A Sad Day to Be You” and “You’re Dreaming” to “Powder Blue” and “Stoplight Kisses”. But he standout may have been “Queen of Them All”, a swooning ballad that turned into a deeply felt romantic declaration with a happy ending.

by Sachyn Mital

18 Feb 2016


One year ago, before the proper release of his biggest album yet Delilah, Anderson East played the Bowery Ballroom solo opening for Sturgill Simpson. One year and one day later, many of those passed by on the road including at least three other shows in New York City, East returned to the Bowery stage as the headliner with his full band in tow. The Nashville based artist has seen his star continue to rise and this show was sold out well in advance. And after seeing him several times before, East proved himself to be a capable and versatile headliner. Another Nashville based artist, Andrew Combs opened for East and his set was well-received by the Americana and country loving audience. Combs performed tracks off his two albums, Worried Man and All These Dreams, with the title track from the latter being a particular highlight of his set. Combs then went down to sign autographs for his newly minted fans.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Cube Escape' Is Free, Frustrating, and Weirdly Compelling

// Moving Pixels

"The Cube Escape games are awful puzzle games, but they're an addicting descent into madness.

READ the article