Latest Blog Posts

by Jonathan Frahm

3 Jun 2015


Epitaph: A Novel of the O.K. Corral isn’t Mary Doria Russell’s first time in the saddle; the New York Times bestselling author had a western hit in 2011’s Doc, about John Henry “Doc” Holliday. Encouraged by the reception that her break from sci-fi convention into the world of historical fiction received, Russell mustered up what could be called her first-ever sequel, here part two, if you will, which is set around the actual events leading to the 1881 shootout at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone.

by Grace Lichtenstein

5 May 2015


After reading The Whites “by Richard Price writing as Harry Brandt” the big question I had was: why the awkward authorial byline? In interviews, Price said he wanted to try his hand at a straight-ahead crime novel, as opposed to his works that make greater sociological statements like Clockers or Lush Life. But The Whites certainly achieves the higher-than-just-police-stuff standard Price has always set for himself.

by Imran Khan

28 Apr 2015


Brad Gooch, whom in the last 20 years or so has become increasingly known for his biographical works, started his career in New York during the ‘70s as a model, landing himself in the pages of high fashion magazines. Modeling, in fact, was a means to keep paying the rent.

Gooch’s true vocation in literature would see his works published in various magazines during the first lap of his literary pursuits.

by Diane Leach

24 Apr 2015


In 1977, director Hebert Ross captivated American moviegoers with The Turning Point. An inside look into the world of professional ballet, the film starred Anne Bancroft, Shirley Maclaine, Tom Skerritt, and a gorgeous young Russian named Mikhail Baryshnikov.

Based on Ross’s wife, ballerina Nora Kaye, and her friend and fellow dancer Isabel Mirrow Brown, The Turning Point incited a brief bout of American balletomania. Actresses Anne Bancroft and Shirley Maclaine were already superstars; Baryshnikov soon joined them. Co-stars Leslie and Ethan Brown, Mirrow’s children, enjoyed long dance careers.

by Andrew Gilstrap

23 Apr 2015


You might get to the end of “Summer People”, the first story in Get in Trouble, and wonder how you got there. Without giving too much away, it’s probably not an ending you’d expect and it kind of comes out of nowhere. 

But then later, while you’re doing the dishes or folding the laundry, it hits you like a smack of lightning: Link set that ending up perfectly, and by the rules laid out in the story, it makes total sense—even if it still might not fit your expectations.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Double Take: The African Queen (1951)

// Short Ends and Leader

"What a time they had, Charlie and Rosie. They'll never lack for stories to tell their grandchildren. And what a time we had at Double Take discussing the spiritual and romantic journey of the African Queen.

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