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by Diane Leach

18 Apr 2016


Marta Zaraska opens Meathooked by reassuring readers of her scientific detachment: “I may be a vegetarian, but I won’t tell you how much meat you should or shouldn’t eat. I’ll just give you the facts.”

Instead, readers are subject to a vegetarian manifesto masquerading as scientific journalism. The use of descriptors more commonly applied to drug addicts is unsettling and offensive, e.g., meat is described as an addictive substance people are either “off” or “on”. Any meat-eater, be they human, animal, or bacterial, is “meathooked”.

by Imran Khan

21 Mar 2016


When I was nine years of age, I would spend hours chicken-pecking out a story on my mother’s electric typewriter, which we kept in the basement. The key for the letter L didn’t work properly, so sometimes when I was typing away it would jam and stick. What would follow would be the hideous, repetitive clacking of a single letter, which would soon fill the entire page with L’s. There was no way to turn it off, save for unplugging the machine. Thus, my story would be ruined.

Later, when my parents divorced and we moved, I’d found an old Remington typewriter tucked behind the piping in the storage space of our new house. It looked like it was falling apart, but I kept it and stored it away, where it continues to collect dust to this day. In the wake of digital technology, I suppose typewriters have become an afterthought. But Richard Polt’s The Typewriter Revolution reacquaints me with the romance of these simple but extraordinary machines.

by Imran Khan

3 Mar 2016


This article is brought to you in partnership with Orbit Books.

In Jordanna Max Brodsky’s at once familiar and promethean world of The Immortals, everyday life as we know it becomes the revisionist undertaking of a writer using Greek mythology as a sculptural tool. Brodsky’s novel is an urban fantasy, a genre that has developed a large following in the last ten years or so, but it’s also an inverse reading on gender politics—one that often finds cynicism on either end of the feminist literary debate. Brodsky’s primary tool for exploratory human drama is Artemis, embodied by the protagonist Selene DiSilva, who endeavours to protect women in need by means of stealth and aggression.

by Chris Barsanti

22 Jan 2016


H is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald

A spare and slashing accounting of the writer’s grief over the death of her father, H is for Hawk is the unlikely story of her coming to grips with the ineffability of life and death via her training of a goshawk to do the thing they do best: Hunt and kill. If it sounds suspiciously like the kind of therapy nonfiction we’ve seen too much of—here’s a simple story about how busy-busy me traveled to Borneo / volunteered with Habitat for Humanity / learned origami and what it taught me about my heart—MacDonald’s bleached-bone prose and unsentimental introspection stands in a class by itself. The merging of her bleak and grieving viewpoint with the hawk’s predatory fixations is seamless, as is her weaving together of a naturalist’s background on the goshawk itself with a sympathetic biographical essay thread on T.H. White’s doomed attempt to reconnect with life by doing the same as her. Uncompromising and beautifully styled, this is the year’s most unlikely masterpiece of a memoir.

 

by Sachyn Mital

23 Dec 2015


Novel images and projects often make the Internet rounds ad nauseum as many various photography sites turn them into clickbait posts after seeing them elsewhere, no matter the artistic value of the project. The hyperbole in the headlines is enough to drive a person mad.

However, this headline is right on point. There have been a few photo projects that I’ve seen that are as inspiring as Vesa Lehtimäki’s work with action figures—and specifically in this collected volume of his work with LEGO Star Wars toys called Small Scenes from a Big Galaxy. While I wish the book had some photos of the non-LEGO Star Wars works from the photographer, I can’t fault the publisher or Lucasfilms for limiting the property upon which this is focused.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Moving Pixels Podcast Looks at the Scenic Vistas and Human Drama of 'Firewatch'

// Moving Pixels

"This week we consider the beautiful world that Campo Santo has built for us to explore and the way that the game explores human relationships through its protagonist's own explorations within that world.

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