Latest Blog Posts

by Nikki Tranter

4 Jan 2008


There will be no more memoirs of the life of Brigadier-General Sir Harry Paget Flashman, VC, outstanding Victorian soldier, coward, bully, womaniser, cad, bounder and hugely admired all-round bad egg. George MacDonald Fraser, chronicler of the great man’s life and editor of his copious personal papers, has died at the age of 82 after losing a battle with cancer but winning a substantial literary reputation and a worldwide army of devotees.

The Times reports here, while NPR has a moving tribute by OED editor, Jesse Sheidlower here.

by Nikki Tranter

2 Jan 2008


This is a neat story to start the day: Rejected author has last laugh. I’m a fan of rejected anythings getting a leg up, so it was doubly nice to read about a 20-times rejected author (by all the majors) getting her day in the sun.

Birmingham writer Catherine O’Flynn has won Costa’s First Novel award (formerly the Whitbread) with her book, What Was Lost. The above article, from the Times Online, lists a surprising number of big-name authors who faced years of rejection before finding success. They include HG Wells, Beatrix Potter, and JK Rowling.

The article also mentions a guy called David Lassman, a much-rejected writer who, in frustration, submitted the opening chapters of Jane Austen books to publishers, changing only the character names, to see what would happen. One in 18 publishers and agents recognised Austen’s work. How awesomely weird.

So, What Was Lostshould be huge. I’m going to check out Lassman’s work, though. I’ll get back to you.

 

by Nikki Tranter

1 Jan 2008


Welcome back to Re:Print.

It’s been a big week, yeah? I’ve spent much of it stifling at work, in an un-air-conditioned DVD shop, hating every single face that says to me: “Wow, it’s hot in here!” Really? We hadn’t noticed. And neither had the last 35 customers to sweat their way through the latest releases. Global warming is well and truly under way, and has landed smack on Australia. Here I am, 11.09pm on New Year’s Day and the air blowing through my office window is filthy and hot. It stinks of dirty grass. No relief, not even at home, not even at midnight. Actually, the split-system in the living room is brilliant, but my partner refuses to let me move the computer next to the TV. So, here I am, and it’s hot. 

New Year’s was a slow one. I spent it watching Wild Palms, of all things. Scouring the ‘net today, though, I see a good time was had by most elsewhere in the universe. We heard fireworks going off, which excited me, until a little boy came into the shop this morning with a “Missing Dog” poster—the terrier named Bonnie ran away in fear of those fireworks, apparently. So, there’s that tradition ruined. Here’s hoping Bonnie finds her way home safely. My pup, Fulci, feels her pain. He spent the noisy clock-turning under a blanket by the couch.

As always, my New Year’s resolution is to “read more”. I say it every year, and usually wind up reading roughly the same amount of books as the year before. With a new house, and a new library all set up and looking awesome in the other room, I’ve decided that even if I read the same amount of books as last year, I want some of them to be those steadily yellowing over there, that I already own. I’m toning down the book-buying, and digging through the existing stockpiles for new and exciting reads. I’ll let you know how I go as the months progress. At the moment, I’m still knee-deep in movie tie-ins, with The Assassination of Jesse James… on the go now, and Death Sentence coming up next. I just finished Reservation Road by John Burnham Schwartz—a quick read, horribly morbid and sad. Jesse James is proving a harder task—Ron Hansen’s language is true to the time period, and I’m wrapping my tongue around old west words more sluggishly than expected. After the movie books, it’s classics all the way. Well, long-standing shelf-dwellers, at any rate.

Here’s to a great 2008 in books. Myself and my co-blogger, Lara Killian, will be here to capture the highs and lows as we see them. For now, here are some articles to read to get you ready for Books ‘08:

Read all about the best books of 2007 set in New Jersey.

Who will be who in 2008 according to the Guardian.

Compare Ty Burr’s reading resolutions to your own, like this one:

Read at least one book that is not being adapted into a major motion picture. In 2007 I really enjoyed reading The Golden Compass and Atonement and No Country for Old Men and Persepolis and The Kite Runner (OK, the last one not so much). Was there anything else that came out last year? Can someone tell my wife I’ll get around to The Omnivore’s Dilemma when Cate Blanchett is signed to star in it?

Hmm, yes.

 

by Nikki Tranter

20 Dec 2007


It’s been a strange week in Book World, something I didn’t exactly anticipate when searching for news articles to post in our first News Round-up, set to continue Fridays in the New Year. I’m excited, though, that a simple Google news search using the word “author” can yield such interesting results. Either Google itself singles out the best stuff, or Book World strives never to bore. I’ll go with the latter, and leave you with Re:Print‘s very first news round-up.

Terry Pratchett struck with on-set Alzheimer’s:
Much has been written on Pratchett’s revelation. This article from the Bath Chronicle is particularly significant as the author is a former staff writer. Pratchett’s response to his condition is light-hearted. More can be found on Pratchett’s website.

George Bernard Shaw‘s biographer murdered:
Britain’s Ham & High newspaper reports: “Allan Chappelow, freelance photographer and the author of several books on the playwright George Bernard Shaw, was found dead in his home in Downshire Hill in June 2006 under a pile of papers”. The more you read, the more curious things get. Accused of Chappelow’s murder is a financial trader. The case may be the first murder trial heard in Central Criminal Court with cameras barred. Chappelow’s home was so badly in need of repair tthat it was on English Heritage’s At-Risk Register—it mysteriously burned down during the murder investigation.

Author of The Snowman remains flummoxed at book’s success:
The 25th anniversary of Raymond Briggs’ The Snowman has forced the the author to comment on something he never wished to discuss ever again his life.

David Walliams of Little Britain signs children’s book deal:
Another one. Reports tells us the book will be aimed at 12-year-olds and will feature “an engaging boy hero”.

Laura Archera Huxley dies:
Aldous Huxley’s fascinating wife passed away this week. This brief article mentions many of her wonderful eccentricities, including her yoga and treadmilling into her 90s, and her dedication to “the nurturing of the possible human” through her children’s charities.

Pope hates The Golden Compass:
Not really a surprise. The Daily Telegraph reports that the Pope has ‘slammed Nicole Kidman’s latest movie The Golden Compass, with the Vatican labeling it “Godless and hopeless”’.

and finally ...

Lisa Welchel from The Facts of Life is proud of pregnant teen star, Jamie Lynn Spears:
Christian book author and former child star, Welchel (aka Blair), says “good on you” to Jamie Lynn for keeping her baby. Welchel is quoted on the ABC News website: “I’m so proud of her for stepping up and being courageous and taking responsibility for her choices, and I believe she’s being a good role model—a good role model in that situation, to choose to have the baby, and … I am supportive of her in that situation.”

by Raymond Cummings

17 Dec 2007


System of a Down: Right Here in Hollywoodby Ben MyersDisinformation, 2007

System of a Down: Right Here in Hollywood
by Ben Myers
Disinformation, 2007

Heirs apparent to Rage Against the Machine’s abdicated rap-metal throne, fellow Los Angelinos System of a Down exploded onto the national scene right around the time (a) those willfully monotonous agit-proppers parted ways and (b) terrorists crashed airplanes into the World Trade Center, lending the lyrics “self-righteous suicide” an eerie prescience. System radiate a political, social, and cultural disgust as intense as that of their forebears, but there are a few key differences: System’s conception of metal is both dizzyingly psychotic and pan-global, reflecting the activism-friendly quartet’s varied musical interests, shared Armenian-American heritage, and appreciation of the value of rock spectacle through a cracked prism. With hit singles like pop-thrash, mock anthem “B.Y.O.B.” (from 2005’s Mesmerize) or the alternately lush and abrasive “Chop Suey!” (from 2001’s Toxicity), System had their cake and scarfed it, too, on a level most artists pray to hit—delivering surreally subversive steaks under dazzling sizzle and making the charts. While Right Here in Hollywood certainly won’t be the last word on the group, it serves as a handy repository of media reports to date, many of which U.K. author Ben Myers penned for Kerrang!. Scholarly, this ain’t: there’s an unnecessarily nasty, partisan edge to the walls of cultural exposition Myers builds while relating System to the general cultural climate of the late 1990s that leaves a bad aftertaste; a shame, since the windows opened into band members’ individual lives reveal a lot.  Who would have thought that pre-System, inventively histrionic lead singer Serj Tankian founded and ran a business customizing “accounting software systems for the jewelry industry in California”? Or that System, early on, were known as Soil? Or that these four go cuckoo the chronic? Answer: anybody with a day to kill and access to Google. But Myers’ deserves credit for compiling all these separate strands and interview pieces into a compelling narrative—and this is important—really exploring the nuts, bolts, emotions, influences, and impacts of System recordings and related side-project output, something super-fan’s biogs like this one usually can’t be bothered with.

Rating: 6

//Mixed media
//Blogs

TIFF 2017: 'The Shape of Water'

// Notes from the Road

"The Shape of Water comes off as uninformed political correctness, which is more detrimental to its cause than it is progressive.

READ the article