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by Sally Fink

21 Jun 2011


The Mall is the debut novel of S.L. Grey, the pseudonym of established South African writers Sarah Lotz and Louis Greenberg. It’s not so much a horror story, as the cover image might suggest, as it is a reflection of the darker side of humanity.

Rhoda needs to get to Highgate Mall as soon as possible to score cocaine from her dealer. She’s supposed to be looking after someone else’s child, but decides to take the kid with her, thinking she won’t be more than five minutes and what’s the worst that could happen? The worst in this case, is that she loses the child, beats up a mall security guard, and has to stay hidden until the mall closes or risk being arrested.

by Kerrie Mills

14 Jun 2011


Every now and again I get sucked into participating in one of those blogger memes where you have to pick out your favourite book. The thing is, I maintain a LiveJournal, and frankly get just a little bored with trying to ensure my picks show me off as deep and sensitive to a community that includes feminist rants about Firefly.

Thus, charter member of the Junior Iconoclasts that I am, I recently decided to get cute and pluck out something like the most obscure or weirdest book I own.

by Paula Cerni

5 May 2011


Numbers lie. How so? Because they always act more innocent than they really are.

As professor of journalism Charles Seife explains in Proofiness: The Dark Arts of Mathematical Deception, numbers as used in everyday life are accessories to objects, people, money, votes, and everything else that is endlessly shady and complex. This is perhaps better grasped with humor than with respect, and so Seife introduces us to ‘proofiness’, the easily manipulated, fake authority of figures, and its associate ‘randumbness’, the tendency to identify patterns in data where none really exist.

by Michael Barrett

4 May 2011


Over the decades, much has been lost from the world of newspaper comics. With the reduction in size came a reduction in scope, grandeur, and ambition.

In the ‘30s, the comic pages were littered with gag strips, adventures, and a wonderful screwball hybrid of the two. The most popular was Sidney Smith’s The Gumps, now shamefully forgotten. Others were Wash Tubbs (later Captain Easy) and Thimble Theater (later Popeye).

And then there was Mickey. Walt Disney started the daily strip in 1930 and turned it over to one Floyd Gottfredson as a two-week replacement. He stayed with the strip 45 years.

by PopMatters Staff

14 Apr 2011


I don’t want to have to be what you expect of me. I want to be what I want to be. I feel I’ve done that and I’ll continue to do that by making my own choices.—Sasha Grey

For those of you who do not recognize her name, you may recognize her face. Sasha Grey has been featured in music videos from the Roots (“Birthday Girl”) and the Smashing Pumpkins (“Superchrist”), has starred in HBO’s Entourage as Vincent Chase’s girlfriend and she’s appeared in American Apparel ads. Grey also played a high class call girl in The Girlfriend Experience, an experimental film by director Steven Soderbergh who selected Grey as the lead because she was someone forging a new path in the adult film business. Though she has moved on from the adult industry (only making it official very recently), fans of that period of her life may find her latest release engaging because it pulls from those experiences. But Grey doesn’t transition into Hollywood naively thinking it is a vast improvement. She urges mainstream media to “send a positive image. Don’t just give the image of sex. Talk about it.”

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