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by Peta Jinnath Andersen

27 Sep 2010


Picking an actor to play the film version of a much loved literary figure is hard work. Finding the perfect match isn’t solely about matching a book, but matching the zeitgeist a wildly popular book creates. Generally speaking, though, to clearly buck the physical description of a character is to enter dangerous waters, particularly in light of last year’s whitewashing scandal.

Although it may sound like little more than a cheap paint job, whitewashing is a real—and insidious—problem in the publishing world. Driven by the perception that covers with black, Hispanic, or Asian (read: non-white) faces don’t sell books, several publishers, most notably Bloomsbury USA, have released covers with white models representing non-white protagonists. Worse, the majority of the whitewashed covers are on young adult books, targeting a demographic already sensitive to issues of identity and belonging.

by Peta Jinnath Andersen

22 Sep 2010


This Saturday, 25 September, marks the beginning of Banned Books Week, “an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment.” Unfortunately—or perhaps fortunately, since it allows us to shine to spotlight on the ridiculousness of book banning in action—Banned Books Week is off to a banning start (pun fully intended).

Wesley Scroggins, an associate professor of management at Missouri State University and speaker at a Missouri Christian seminar, is seeking to ban Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, a novel about a girl dealing with the aftermath of a rape. Stockton, Missouri, recently banned Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian earlier this month.

by Peta Jinnath Andersen

8 Sep 2010


Photo found on SheKnows.com

When I was in high school, I read an essay about the importance of women writing in first person. I can’t recall the exact words, or even the anthology I read it in, but the gist of it was this: third person is considered more literary, and the attitude from which men write, because men wish to be hailed as literary. Women write in first person, not because they do not wish to be literary, but because to write ‘I’ and be recognized as a woman, is still a fresh and beautiful thing.

Recently, authors Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Weiner took on the New York Times in a fairly public manner, decrying the paper as sexist for routinely skipping commercial reviews in favor of literary ones. Here’s what Jennifer Weiner had to say, from their interview with Jason Pinter, over at The Huffington Post (26 August 2010):

“I think it’s a very old and deep-seated double standard that holds that when a man writes about family and feelings, it’s literature with a capital L, but when a woman considers the same topics, it’s romance, or a beach book—in short, it’s something unworthy of a serious critic’s attention.”

by Shawn O'Rourke

27 Aug 2010


Random House has reached a deal with Andrew Wylie, controversial head of The Wylie Agency, concerning thirteen titles the book agent released in e-format exclusively for Amazon.com under the digital imprint,Odyssey Editions. Wylie shocked the publishing book world last month with his announcement that 20 books from the impressive stable of talent the agent has under contract were going to be distributed exclusively for Amazon’s Kindle. The move, immediately attacked by Random House, highlighted tensions over author royalties for e-books and ambiguities over digital content in contracts that were written prior to rise of electronic publishing. While Wylie, received support from the Author’s Guild, he heavily criticized by industry insiders and publishers who claimed that his actions violated existing agreements (See previous RE:Print post for more on the controversy).

Following the joint statement of the agreement, Wylie removed the disputed titles, which included Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and Salman Rushdie’s Midnights Children, leaving Odyssey Editions with only seven remaining titles. According an article on The Wall Street Journal, Random House intends to the release the books in e-format next week.

by Shawn O'Rourke

12 Aug 2010


Andrew Wylie, agent and head of the prestigious Wylie Agency, has been no stranger to controversy during his long career in the world of books. Lauded by some as a champion of writers and criticized by others as a “jackal” and “provocateur,” Wylie has developed a reputation that begs for comparisons with the character Ari Gold from HBO’s Entourage. Although dogged by charges of client stealing and other unethical practices, Wylie has come to represent over 700 hundred writers, including Salman Rushdie, Philip Roth, Dave Eggers, and the estates of Jorge Luis Borges, John Updike, and Norman Mailer.   

Last month, Wylie caused an upheaval in the publishing world with his announcement that he had given the exclusive digital distribution rights for 20 books whose authors he represents to Amazon.com for release on their Kindle electronic reading device. The books, which will be released through a new company established by Wylie, Odyssey Editions, are reflective of his reputation as a advocate of writers who have made substantive impacts on the world of literature as opposed to just being commercially popular. Included in the list of newly available e-books, priced at just $9.99, are Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Invisible Man, and Updike’s Rabbit series. Although not a fan of the Kindle originally (Wylie once stated in an interview, “I have a Kindle. I used it for an hour and a half and put it in the closet.”), this move shows the Wylie is not the type to let his personal hangups get in the way of his larger objectives.

//Mixed media
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'Fire Emblem Heroes' Is a Bad Crossover

// Moving Pixels

"Fire Emblem Heroes desperately and shamelessly wants to monetize our love for these characters, yet it has no idea why we came to love them in the first place.

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