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Friday, Jun 27, 2014
This is what happens when the idea for a film must pitch itself to its audience over and over again until the audience is convinced.

Michael Bay doesn’t make movies. If there was a Department of Propaganda in the US, he’d be the nation’s number one visual jingoist. His imagery is all sun-dappled backdrops, waving fields of grain, and stark red, white, and blues against unholy inhuman mayhem.


His heroes are goofy and wholesome, his villains similarly styled but teeming with untold evil. He paints his single digit IQ plotlines in strokes so broad that newborn babies seem to understand them while simultaneously pushing his F/X wizards to the brink of individual madness with his desire for a photorealistic apocalypse.


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Friday, Jun 27, 2014
This is a terrific, dark dystopian nightmare mixed with flashes of Terry Gilliam-esque absurdity and the filmmaker's own fractured frame of reference.

The story behind Bong Joon-Ho‘s Snowpiercer is almost as exhilarating and as nail-biting as the movie itself. By now, the details are legend: the film was highly touted as the first major mainstream English language effort from the man responsible for Memories of Murder, Mother, and perhaps best known of all, the giant monster movie The Host. Adapted from a French graphic novel series Le Transperceneige, Oldboy‘s Park Chan-wook secured the rights to the property and gave it to his friend to direct.


After making a splash on the festival circuit, the Weinstein Company stepped in to distribute the movie in the West…and soon the trouble started. Scissorhanded suit Harvey Weinstein wanted a good “20 minutes” removed from the movie. He also demanded title cards, narration, and other ways to help an American audience “understand” the thriller. For him, it   just didn’t “play in Peoria”. Bong balked, and thus began a publicity war which saw both sides dig their heels in for a long battle.


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Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014
There's really nothing wrong with the movie except the script, which has lots of firepower for something so tiresome.

Struggling evening-jacketed songwriter Terry (Robert Taylor) moons around Miami because he’s fallen in love at a distance with chic gossamer-caped Consuelo (Norma Shearer). When he loses $3,500 to her at chemin-de-fer, she hires him to run interference against unfaithful cad Tony (George Sanders), with whom she’s hopelessly in love. Terry will pretend to be Consuelo’s lover, and he’s to ignore all Consuelo’s later orders to the contrary.


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Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014
Harvey Weinstein is a savvy showbiz staple with a tendency to re-edit film -- drastically. Here are ten cases where he tackled filmmakers head on. Few survived.
Above from the poster for Edward Scissorhands (1990)


He has a reputation for being a savvy entrepreneur, a tough negotiator, and a true cinephile. Many believe he’s done more for the independent and arthouse scene in the US than any studio tycoon before or since. He’s backed numerous Oscar winners, guided several actors and actresses to their own Academy glory, and is constantly on the lookout for new talent both at home and abroad.


So why does Harvey Weinstein also have one of the worst standings in film? Perhaps the nickname “Harvey Scissorhands” can provide some enlightenment. Over the decades he’s been in the business called show, Weinstein has made more than a few enemies, usually with his actions both outside and inside the editing room. Notorious for taking films and fiddling with them (both with and without their creator’s consent), he’s becomes a blight to some, a savior to others.


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Monday, Jun 23, 2014
Fast and loose, with dialogue driving almost every moment, Giuseppe Andrews became the new Godard of trailer park, hotel and apartment tales.

Garbanzo Gas is either the most brilliant pro-vegetarian film ever made, or the most maddening deconstruction of meat’s magical allure since the Sawyer clan discovered the value in human hamburger. Centering on the mythical, mouthwatering promise of steak (and a fully dressed baked potato side dish), and using the actual source of such succulence as the pro/con catalyst, (Giuseppe) Andrews expands outward, taking on suicidal tendencies, homicidal madness, insanity, and fixation. Overflowing with the filmmaker’s trademark deranged dialogue, and incorporating a tender performance from Andrews’ staple Vietnam Ron, this well-meaning message movie is far more effective than a perverse PETA rally in reiterating the value of animal life, and the uselessness of human existence.”



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