Call for Book Reviewers and Bloggers

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Jun 18, 2014
Is the Warners/DC rumor wishful thinking, a fool's paradise, or a strategic answer to Marvel's present domination of the genre?
Above: Justice League


One of the hottest rumors going around Hollywood right now centers on Warner Bros. and their plans to put out numerous DC-themed films over the next few years. It’s a move that many in the comic book fanbase have been longing for and yet never thought they’d see.


If the story pans out (and there’s always an “if” with such web exclusives), we will be inundated with cinematic product, beginning with Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice in May of 2016, a Shazam movie two months later, followed up by Sandman during Christmas of the same year. Then, 2017 will be equally overflowing with a Justice League film proper (May), a Wonder Woman stand-alone (July), and a Green Lantern/Flash pair-up (the Holidays). Add in an official Man of Steel 2 for May of 2018 and you’ve got quite the ambitious schedule.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014
For our second part of this cinematic weeper overview, we present ten more films sure to get your tear ducts flowing.

Recapping The Top Tearjerkers in Film of All Time: Part 1, we moviegoers love our communal cry fests.


If you missed this pleasure in the theaters, you can indulge at home with others who, hopefully, won’t tease you, but will ask you to pass the tissue box, instead.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jun 16, 2014
This modest B picture from MGM offers unique pleasures and allows us to explore the mystery of writer-director Norman Foster.

Now available on demand from Warner Archive, this modest B picture from MGM offers unique pleasures and allows us to explore the mystery of writer-director Norman Foster.


This is the almost-nothing-happens, not-quite-romance between a tall, gangling, aw-shucks, naive young cowpoke (Carleton Carpenter) and a tight-sweatered blonde (Jan Sterling) who always seems about two minutes away from taking his cash and leaving him flat. The story is so light and anecdotal, it’s a wonder it stretches to 70 minutes, but those 70 engage the viewer enough to see it through as our cowboy chalks up a learning experience.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Jun 13, 2014
The color of going too far

RaroVideo’s DVD of Alberto Cavallone’s difficult-to-describe Blue Movie is an important release that I hope presages more from this obscure cult figure. I say this with due consideration. Many people, attracted by the title’s promise of sleaze (on which the film delivers both less and more than most would wish), will find the movie a confusing, unwatchable eyesore, which it is. This is partly for reasons beyond the late Cavallone’s control, and partly due to his deliberate vision.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Jun 13, 2014
The play's the thing

The Reckoning begins with lovely, stylized, cold images of nature while Nicholas (Paul Bettany) shaves his head in a forest, drinks from a stream, and flashes back to his downfall from priesthood for sins of the flesh. After a terrifying encounter, he learns (again) that appearances are deceiving and takes up with a troupe of traveling players who perform “Mysteries” (Biblical plays) across the rural England of 1380.


They arrive at one village, dominated by the castle of the local lord (Vincent Cassel), just in time to witness a mute woman’s conviction for strangling a boy. She’s sentenced to hang. The troupe’s leader (Willem Dafoe) wants to put on a new kind of play, one that dramatizes the local event. After arguing the morality of this, their investigation and production stirs up new evidence and lots of trouble, as we realize we’re in yet another plot about a serial killer of children. This is apparently what we need to take our entertainment seriously nowadays.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements
Win a 15-CD Pack of Brazilian Music CDs from Six Degrees Records! in PopMatters Contests on LockerDome

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.