CFP: The Legacy of Radiohead's 'The Bends' 20 Years On [Deadlines: 4 Feb / 19 Feb]

 
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015
High on body count and choreography, this movie is fortunately packed with enough action to distract from a mediocre plot.

After the Man With No Name from Sergio Leone’s masterful Dollar trilogy (1964-66) and Sergio Corbucci’s Django, who appeared in over 30 different Spaghetti Westerns before Quentin Tarantino resurrected and modified him in the 2012 American reboot Django Unchained, the most notorious Spaghetti Western anti-hero goes by the name Sartana. Although characters with the name appeared in dozens of films, it is for the original cycle of five films beginning in 1968 and ending in 1972 that he is remembered. Gianni Garko played him in four of these films including the first one, If You Meet Sartana… Pray For Your Death (1968), in which he gave birth to the character under the direction of Gianfranco Parolini.


Sartana is a gambler who wears a silky long black coat with ruby red colored lining that matches his long tie. His black hat is kept on with a draw-string. He’s undoubtedly one of the best dressed protagonists in the genre, and he’s almost as quick-witted as the Man With No Name. He takes great pleasure in setting elaborate booby-traps. His weapon of choice is a four-barreled Derringer pocket pistol, the type that a prostitute working in a brothel would hide in her brassiere. But when Sartana, time and time again, pulls it out of thin air like a magician pulling a rabbit out of a hat to blow his adversaries away, you can’t imagine anyone but him using it. Although If You Meet Sartana… Pray For Your Death is the first film to feature this memorable and incredibly cool spaghetti western anti-hero, it isn’t the best. 


Most of the film’s problems are related to its screenplay, which was written by Renato Izzo, Werner Hauff, and director Gianfranco Parolini from a story by Luigi De Santis, Fabbio Piccioni, and producer Adolfo Cagnacci. With this many individuals contributing to the film’s plot, it’s no wonder that it is complex to the point of incomprehension. All I know is that there is some gold and everyone wants it.


By “everyone”, I mean a bunch of Mexican bandits led by General Tampico (Fernando Sancho), a gang of American outlaws affiliated with a coke-head in a velvet suit named Lasky (William Berger), a knife thrower named Morgan (Klaus Kinski) who wears a bell on his boot and is said to be “like a cat”, a corrupt politician (Sydney Chaplin, son of Charlie) who is blackmailed over and over, his candy eating fat friend of a banker (Gianni Rizzo), a blond woman (Heidi Fischer) who moves from one man to the next, and, of course Sartana (Gianni Garko), who jumps in and out of the conflict between hang-out sessions with a laughing old man (Franco Pesce), an artist turned undertaker.


I struggled to keep tabs on all these characters, where the gold they were chasing is, the statuses of their always changing allegiances, and who is double crossing who. Not only was I confused while watching If You Meet Sartana… Pray For Your Death, but after the credits finished rolling, I still wasn’t able to piece all the loose ends together. In fact, the more I think about its plot, the more confusing it gets. Maybe I need to watch the film again, but based off my initial viewing I can say with confidence that it makes absolutely no sense.


The story, however, doesn’t have to make sense. Getting introduced to the unforgettable character of Sartana, who Garko seems born to play with his relaxed acting and mysterious aura, made the confusion of the plot insignificant. If you’re anything like me, watching If You Meet Sartana… Pray For Your Death will make you hungry for more Sartana in spite of its messy plot. This film, in fact, could be viewed as the perfect warm-up for the four Sartana films that follow it: I Am Sartana, Your Angel Of Death (1969); Have A Good Funeral My Friend…  Sartana Will Pay (1970); Light The Fuse… Sartana Is Coming (1970); and even Sartana’s Here… Trade Your Pistol For A Coffin (1972), which stars George Hilton rather than Garko as Sartana.


Alongside the introduction of the legendary Sartana character are the relentless and inspired action sequences, which fortunately help distract from the weak plot for two reasons. First, these action scenes have a hint of the stunt-heavy, acrobatic-like shooting jumps and running tumbles that the director, Parolini, would later put on fully display in his Sabata trilogy (1969-71). Second, with at least 25 deaths taking place in the first ten minutes of the film, these scenes result in one of the highest body-counts in the entire genre. This stunt work, though nothing extraordinary, adds energy to the chases on horseback and the gunfights that take place among the sand dunes, while this constantly growing body-count adds to the vaguely dreamlike feeling that the character of Sartana, with his ability to suddenly vanish and reappear like a mystical magician, evokes with his presence. 


Although the coolness of the Sartana character and the action sequences he takes part in successfully distracted me from the mess of a plot, they didn’t distract me from all the Leone lifting that Parolini does. Without even mentioning the similarities between Sartana and the Man With No Name, since every spaghetti western protagonist that came after Clint Eastwood was expected to emulate at least some of his amoral anti-hero characteristics, Parolini stole too much of If You Meet Sartana… Pray For Your Death from Leone’s far superior Dollar trilogy. From A Fistful of Dollars (1964) he steals the laughing old man character who works as an undertaker and befriends the film’s protagonist. From A Few Dollars More (1965) he steals the Man With No Name’s use of a musical pocket watch to strike fear in his enemies and announce his gun-wielding arrival. From The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) he steals the general plot involving a hunt for gold and the constant double-crossing and changes in allegiances between those hunting it—though, as I already pointed out, he and his writers failed miserably in flushing their version out. 


Regardless of its flaws in plot and general lack of originality, If You Meet Sartana… Pray For Your Death is a great introduction to the Sartana character, with lots of entertaining action sequences, an intense score by Piero Piccioni, and a talented cast.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jan 5, 2015
This enigmatic Iranian film is designed to undermine your comfort.

Manuscripts Don’t Burn, whose title is taken from the satirical Russian novel The Master and Margarita, is almost more important as an artifact of its own existence than as a drama. Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof has received a jail sentence for “filming without a permit” (according to Wikipedia) but apparently has yet to serve it, and is also under a 20-year ban from making films. Jafar Panahi responded to similar sentence by shooting a clandestine video called This Is Not a Film, and Rasoulof responds by secretly shooting a film in which none of the actors or crew receive credit. This is supposedly for their safety, though it can hardly be difficult to identify them. Several attended the premiere at Cannes.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Jan 2, 2015
While not quite up to being included in Short Ends and Leader's Best Films list, these ten films still represent the reason for each movie season.

As with any category which includes the descriptive term “underrated”, setting a clear set of standards is often impossible. Indeed, someone out there right now has already perused the list below, taken umbrage with at least a couple of the choices, and is wondering how “anyone” could consider any one of the titles as “underrated”. Perhaps an illustrative explanation is in order.


For someone who watches movies for a living (or what some call “a living”), underrated usually means “underappreciated” or “fell through the cracks”. Such a film stands in contrast to the mainstream mindset that gives the latest Michael Bay bombast a billion dollars at the box office, but can’t see beyond the spectacle to something smaller, more inventive, and artistic. The tag “underrated” can also mean a commercial endeavor poorly handled by the PR and marketing people hired by the studios, their inability to craft a persuasive ad campaign sorely limiting a good movie’s returns.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Jan 1, 2015
From brazen biopics to murky examinations of marriage, Short Ends and Leader's picks for 2014's best flicks are a compelling bunch.

What was the best film of (insert year here)?


Critics get asked this question a lot. Perhaps too much. Unlike aged steaks, or wine vintages, films often take a while to work their way into your psyche. You struggle with the themes, or you make rash, kneejerk judgments that, later, come back to add a layer of illegitimacy to your otherwise learned opinion.


Then, after 12 months of screenings, after 365 days of streaming links, Oscar PR, studio shilling, and countless combinations of the good, the bad, and the downright dopey, we are asked to wrap things up in a neat little list, a consensus compendium which does something no film reviewer is totally capable of: determining the very best of a varied artform. Can you argue that animation is better or worse than foreign filmmaking? Can horror be part of the discussion when so many of the genre’s examples are rotten, at best?


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Dec 29, 2014
Here are 10 films from 2014 that we wish North Korea would have kept us from seeing instead of The Interview.

Of all the lists you’ll be perusing over the course of the next few weeks, this one was, without a doubt, the hardest to make. Not because 2014 was so overloaded with quality product; just the opposite, actually. When you have to leave out terrible titles like Sex Tape, Tammy, Exodus: Gods and Kings, Dumb and Dumber To, The Best of Me, No Good Deed, The Last of Robin Hood, As Above So Below, Are You Here, Let’s Be Cops, The Devil’s Knot, A Haunted House 2, Dark House, The Outsider, Vampire Academy, and I, Frankenstein off your list to make room for the real crap, you know you’re dealing with worst of Hollywood’s hopeless dung heap… and that’s just the ones we were unfortunate enough to see. All around the artform are independent and self-released atrocities just waiting to waste one’s time and make them doubt in the existence of God—or talent.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2015 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.