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Wednesday, Jun 18, 2014
Is the Warners/DC rumor wishful thinking, a fool's paradise, or a strategic answer to Marvel's present domination of the genre?
Above: Justice League


One of the hottest rumors going around Hollywood right now centers on Warner Bros. and their plans to put out numerous DC-themed films over the next few years. It’s a move that many in the comic book fanbase have been longing for and yet never thought they’d see.


If the story pans out (and there’s always an “if” with such web exclusives), we will be inundated with cinematic product, beginning with Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice in May of 2016, a Shazam movie two months later, followed up by Sandman during Christmas of the same year. Then, 2017 will be equally overflowing with a Justice League film proper (May), a Wonder Woman stand-alone (July), and a Green Lantern/Flash pair-up (the Holidays). Add in an official Man of Steel 2 for May of 2018 and you’ve got quite the ambitious schedule.


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Monday, Jun 2, 2014
There are very few "super" superstars on the planet. Considering the cost, career wise, being a journeyman seems to have far more perks.

Their names are synonymous with box office gold. Even in arenas outside of film, they find a way to stay in the public eye long after their regional value has been depleted. Put another way, Americans may have long given up on the musical oddball they call Michael Jackson, but before his untimely death in 2009, his planned world tour was predicted to go gangbusters overseas. You see, whether we like it or not, our entertainment has gone global. Let’s repeat that, with proper emphasis, OUR entertainment has gone global. Blockbuster foreign films barely get recognition outside of arthouses and critics groups here in the US, but when an American movie gets released abroad, it can bank significantly more money that it could ever make on our shores. Why? The answer is obvious: star power.


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Tuesday, May 27, 2014
The newest installment of the X-Men movie franchise is good, not great. Here are five reasons why.

Let’s get something out of the way right up from. Yours truly didn’t “hate” X-Men: Days of Future Past. Not by a long shot. Do I have problems with it? Absolutely. Do I think it stands as one of the best installments in Marvel’s movie mutant mythos? Sure. Is it the number one film in the franchise? No. That title goes to its predecessor, First Class. Why? Well, I liked Matthew Vaughan’s approach more than Bryan Singer’s (still unsure of why this hit or miss filmmaker gets so much fanboy love), I’ve grown tired of the overuse of some characters, and am not sure what I was supposed to get out of the experience except it being a set-up for yet another in a long line of “planned” trilogies. Still, I was entertained, intrigued, and in the end, capable of recommending it to any who still reads film reviews as a reference guide. So, you may be asking, why the caveat? If you liked it, what’s the problem?


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Wednesday, May 14, 2014
A lot of early reviews claim that "nothing happens" in the first hour of this film. Those opinions couldn't be more wrong.

Sometimes, my fellow film critics infuriate me. One of the most highly anticipated movies of 2014 has to be Gareth Edwards reboot of the beloved giant lizard Godzilla. Back in 1998, Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin, hot off their success with Independence Day, were hired by Tri-Star Pictures to fulfill their rights agreement with Japanese producer Toho Studios for a trilogy of American Godzilla movies with the only prerequisite being they stay “true” to the original films and warn against nuclear proliferation and runaway technology. Naturally, the duo ignore most of said prerequisites. While there was promise in their approach, the final result was a ridiculous combination of showboating set-pieces and lax character development. Audiences agreed.


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Tuesday, Apr 8, 2014
By jumping right into the whole Dark Knight/Clark Kent pairing, DC once again shows how clueless it is regarding the handling of their heroes.

Over the weekend of 4 April, HBO premiered last Summer’s divisive DC tentpole Man of Steel. For those unfamiliar with the property, this was Warner Bros. attempt, with help of Dark Knight maestro Christopher Nolan (in a producer’s role) of bringing Superman back to the big screen. After 2006’s equally contentious take by Bryan Singer, Superman Returns, many saw limited possibilities for harnessing Krypton’s last hope into a Marvel like movie dynasty. Indeed, while that comic label became a billion dollar multinational conglomerate, director Zack Snyder was still trying to map out a strategy that would make our greatest American hero “super” again. Some say he succeeded. Others had serious reservations. Overall, the film was a big enough hit that Warners ordered a sequel and that’s when the shitstorm happened.


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