Call for Book Reviewers and Bloggers

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Jun 12, 2014
Decadence sets in.

I have a weakness for heist or caper films, a chic and sleek subgenre of action (or comedy, or both) that flourished in the Sixties, yielding much silliness. Today’s example, The Biggest Bundle of Them All, manages to be entertaining while remaining utterly trivial and disposable. Even though it coincides with The Thomas Crown Affair and pre-dates The Italian Job, classics of the genre, it already feels like late-model decadence is setting in.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Jun 12, 2014
The new Dumb and Dumber trailer suggests that 20 years is too long for a sequel to a comedy "classic."

Okay, so it’s just a trailer. Okay, so there are millions of Farrelly Brothers fans out there who have been waiting for this sequel like the second coming. Okay, so both Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels have seen their career fortunes wane a bit in the 20 years since the first film, so we can excuse their passion/paycheck cashing appearance here. Okay, the scenes are taken out of context and represent a mere sampling of the supposed humor this film has in store for us (2:40 minutes out of 90, one imagines). However, and this is a pretty big caveat, it’s quite possible that the Farrelly Brothers have simply lost their knack. Want proof? Okay…


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014
Think you're impervious to crying during a movie? Here is the first part of our two part overview of films guaranteed to get you weeping.

Audiences love to go to the movies that make them laugh. The communal good cheer of a comedy cannot be properly enjoyed unless you’re part of a group, braying like hyperactive hyenas. Movie goers also love to be frightened. Again, there is some kind of mutual bonding that occurs when individuals get together and experience the dread and suspense provided by some Master pulling the cinematic strings.


When it comes to crying, however, hysterics are fine. Heartstrings are not.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jun 9, 2014
This is a story for those who've never experience the effects of a terminal disease, a narrative aimed at the obvious naïveté of its young audience.

I’m no stranger to the tragic effects of cancer. Two years ago, my mother-in-law died of the disease and from 1985 until 1996, my father suffered from the lingering side effects of a massive brain tumor. Both of these aging individuals were strong and vital before their diagnosis. One passed after 11 short days. The other battled with prehistoric medications and equally dated medical care, resulting in strokes, incapacitation, and an incredibly low quality of life.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Jun 6, 2014
The entire first half of this film feels frivolous and unimportant. That is, until Gene Jones shows up.

We all remember the shocking photos, bodies bloating in the hot African sun, lost lives staggered like rails in a forgotten lumber yard. Next to them lay Dixie Cups of death, a Kool-aid (or Flavor-Aid, actually) potion poisoned to prevent the real world from learning the truth about its cloistered cult beliefs. It was here in Northern Guyana were the Reverend Jim Jones, an expatriate preacher from San Francisco who decided to move his impressionable parish lock, stock, and secretive barrels halfway across the globe in order to find peace and tranquility.


But when Congressman Leo Ryan arrived in November of 1978 to gather information as part of a fact finding tour, he was initially met with open arms. Later, Jones’ guards would open fire, killing the House member along with four others. When outsiders finally stormed the compound, they found the corpses of 909 church members. Jones was dead as well, an allegedly self-inflicted bullet wound to the head.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements
Win a 15-CD Pack of Brazilian Music CDs from Six Degrees Records! in PopMatters Contests on LockerDome

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.