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by Bill Gibron

5 Nov 2013

Musicals are once again off the radar, though this month we will see its limited return with an update of the “classic” Langston Hughes piece, Black Nativity. Naturally, the original gospel themed show has been given an urban update by director Kasi Lemmons, and one imagines a new soundtrack thanks to a need to feed the demo, but the truth is that, outside of Disney’s upcoming Frozen, we’re back to where we were pre-Chicago. Singing and dancing on film is being relegated to gang-like standoffs ala Step Up and Pitch Perfect or refashioned standards with new material included to make the supposed stars (contractually) happy. While there are rumors of new projects (we’ve already got a take on Stephen Sondheim’s revisionist fairy tale, Into the Woods, in the works, featuring Johnny Depp and Meryl Streep) are abundant, few in film can see the forest of available material from the trees of ticket sales.

by Bill Gibron

29 Oct 2013

Every film genre takes skill to realize. A good drama is just as hard to make as a good comedy, convincing sci-fi as difficult as exciting action. Nowhere is this more true than in the realm of horror. Frightening people, like making them laugh or sing along, is an individualized and rare commodity. Doing it consistently means you’ve not only cracked that particularly difficult nut, but you’ve found that elusive skill of worming your way into people’s exceedingly jaded and cynical psyche time and time again. It is only then when you can be called a true horror maestro, one of the few fear manufacturers who the devoted rely on to deliver the goods time and time again. Sure, there are anomalies here and there, but for the most part, their reliability overcomes the occasional lapse.

by Bill Gibron

22 Oct 2013

Whenever the calendar rolls over to a certain 31 October, fright fans break out their opinions and wax poetic about the best and worst horror films ever made. While it may seem like nothing more than a rabid fanboy pastime, that fact is that it’s not an easy task. Like comedy, terror is in the heart of the beholder, too personal to be easily agreed upon. What some find frightening gives others a case of the uncontrollable giggles and it’s rare when fear can be universally applied. As a result, making any list of yeas and nays allows for lots of second guessing and subjective stipulations, especially in the arena of b-a-d. Many can’t get past the numerous nonsensical sequels that endlessly pour out of the studio system, pointing to franchises gone god-awful as their primary examples of tepid terror. For others, the offerings of the past, the low budget efforts of dollar driven distributors that did little except waste 80 minutes of the drive-in owners or matinee movie audience’s running time.

by Bill Gibron

15 Oct 2013

Hollywood loves a remake. From the earliest days of the artform, studios have sifted through previous hits (and a few near misses) to reformulate and resell the same stuff to audiences who don’t seem to care about the subterfuge. Over and over again, similarity has struggled against individuality for celluloid recognition. For example, Love Affair, the 1994 Warren Beatty/Annette Bening vehicle was actually an update of the Cary Grant/Deborah Kerr weeper An Affair to Remember, which itself was a take on 1939’s Love Affair. There have been several A Star Is Borns and dozens of Draculas. In fact, horror seems to stoke the fires of reconfiguration more than any other genre. Go down a list of classic fright films and you’ll see a smattering of originals and a whole lot of reduxes.

by Bill Gibron

8 Oct 2013

It’s October again with only a few more weeks of marketing mandated terror to go. With cable channels and the Internet working overtime telling you what’s fright and what’s wrong, it seems like every angle of All Hallow’s Eve is covered, except, like any regulated holiday, the same of scares seem to be offered up. After all, how many times can you watch The Exorcist or The Evil Dead? Is there an expiration date on Halloween and its far too many sequels, or the various fleeting subgenres such as torture porn and J-horror? Indeed, if this particular celebration is all about delivering the shivers, how can something so well known provide said dread?

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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