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by Bill Gibron

1 Jun 2015


She only appears in the last 15 minutes of the film. Mrs. Voorhees’ presence is, at first, rather disorienting, since we’ve seen so few adults during the course of the carnage. As she tries to comfort a distraught and very upset Alice, her almost blasé response to the concept of a killer on the loose makes her instantly suspect.

Still, we’re willing to go with this well-meaning matriarch, at least, up to a point. And then Betsy Palmer, TV star from decades past, opens up her predatory pearly whites and starts telling the story of a boy named Jason, and soon we see the light. As the mother of the drowned lad, Mrs. Voorhees means business, and in her line of work (carving up teenagers), business is booming.

by Bill Gibron

23 Feb 2015


So American Sniper didn’t sneak into the Winner’s circle for either Best Picture and/or Best Actor. Boyhood, ballyhooed by almost everyone who saw it at Sundance last year as “the film to beat”, had to settle for a single Academy Award (for Best Supporting Actress Patricia Arquette).

Host Neil Patrick Harris neither saved nor sunk the annual combination of critical reevaluation and industry backslapping, and while at least one long standing wrong was righted (we can now call Julianne Moore “Academy Award Winner…”), Richard Linklater et. al. must feel like the rest of Selma right now (which picked up a trophy for Best Song).

by Bill Gibron

16 May 2014


He is, perhaps, the most influential surrealist of all time, arguably more important than Salvador Dali and better known than movement’s founder, Andre Breton. For some, however, the categorization doesn’t fully give Swiss artist Hans Ruedi “H.R.” Giger enough credit. To them, he was more than just a critical delineation. As a genre prophet, his impact on science fiction, fantasy, and horror is unquestioned. As an inspiration, he’s the godfather of too many cultural connections (Cyberpunk, Goth, Future Shock) to name. While some consider his work borderline pornographic (and have persecuted him for such over the years), Giger remains an embedded part of our contemporary consciousness. After all, who can look at the dual mouthed monster from Ridley Scott’s Alien and not instantly distinguish the man’s amazing style. Both instantly recognizable and frighteningly foreign, it marks the culmination, and the mere surface, of his entire creative canon.

by Bill Gibron

25 Feb 2014


Last week, Fox finally settled on the cast for its new reboot of the Fantastic Four “franchise”. We use the last term lightly since the Tim Story films, while popular, proved less so with fans and film critics. Indeed, fanboy nation has been in a froth since Doctor Doom became something other than his classic comic book counterpart and the Silver Surfer showed up to argue for his need for a stand-alone film (and a better visionary behind the lens). Those who remember the original incarnation of the quartet and their impact on the genre didn’t like the updated Four, and instead, hoped that Fox would remedy the situation this time around. However, the studio once again proved as clueless as others were when making Marvel movies outside the company’s carefully controlled output.

by Bill Gibron

29 Jan 2014


That noise you heard over the weekend was the sound of American Hustle‘s juggernaut to a predetermined Oscar night sweep coming to a shocking and sudden halt. Thanks to the Directors Guild of America, and its decision to award Alfonso Cuaron its highest honor as the Best of 2014, the once seemingly closed Academy race is once again wide open, turning the conventional wisdom into a pundit question mark. At this point, it truly seems like anyone’s race. Though certain categories appear locked up (why, oh WHY is everyone simply handing Cate Blanchett the trophy for Best Actress for the Tennessee Williams’ wannabe Blue Jasmine?), Best Picture, and perhaps, other lesser categories, now have at least a three way tie for eventual bragging rights.

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