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Thursday, Feb 19, 2015
Both the underrated '80s drama River's Edge and the recently released Metalhead reflect on the importance of metal to the existential struggles of adolescence.

Back in late 1986 or early 1987, I happened upon an obscure new movie on TV that had all the warnings that would capture a 16 year-old boy’s attention: extreme violence, nudity, for adults only. Tell a boy that age that he can’t watch a movie, and you bet he’ll watch it. The movie on this late night was called River’s Edge, and as I’d quickly find out, not only was it nowhere near as titillating as the warnings implied, but it turned out to be a deeply serious portrait of young misfit metalheads in a scuzzy town, something I related to immediately.


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Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015
Steve Earle's new album, Terraplane, takes this lyrical master down to his Texas blues roots.

Steve Earle channels his Texas blues roots with his latest album, Terraplane—named for the noted song by Robert Johnson, but known to me in the well-circulated Canned Heat live tapes. Referencing everyone from Lightning Hopkins to Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top, Earle interviews himself, but doesn’t get caught up in his script. He deftly name drops his own stint in jail, averting some questions by glossing over them and moving on so quickly that the pace is disrupted when going back to pick up dropped threads of thought. Earle respects those with whom he works, highlighting Chris Masterson’s (previously featured here on Country Fried Rock) role in developing this blues trail during sound checks.


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Monday, Feb 16, 2015
After K-pop's dark and turbulent 2014, January 2015 may have marked the beginning of a new direction for the industry.

The year 2014 was a troubled one for K-pop. Whether you want to join the many calling it the “K-pocalypse”, as some have argued, it’s hard to deny that it was a dark year for the industry. Even with some incredible music released, the amount of death and lawsuits surely signals change coming ahead, to say nothing of Jessica’s departure from legendary girl group Girls’ Generation. So January of 2015, then, is the first glimpse of what’s to come following those trying times. Perhaps there’s no majestic phoenix rising from the ashes just yet, but January 2015 was certainly not devoid of interesting K-pop.


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Friday, Feb 13, 2015
The 183rd most acclaimed album of all time is this week's Counterbalance, a pastoral 1968 masterpiece from the Kinks. God save little shops, china cups and virginity.

Klinger: How in the hell has it taken us this long to talk about the Kinks? Ray Davies is (and this can’t just be me) one of the finest songwriters in rock history. Sure, he might not have the incisive fogginess of Dylan or the cantankerous anthemry of Lennon, but he can usually be counted on to bring a certain dignity — something very close to wisdom — to the proceedings that you just don’t often hear. I suppose the rap on the Kinks is that they never made their masterpiece. For whatever reason, they never delivered a career-defining statement of purpose that would match a Sgt. Pepper or a Blonde on Blonde or an Exile on Main St. Over the years, though, critics have come around to this week’s record, The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society, which currently sits at No. 183 on the Great List. Which, if you buy into the rap on the Kinks, pretty much makes sense.


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Thursday, Feb 12, 2015
While the Grammys may have gotten metal absolutely wrong again, a new album by the Swedish outfit Marduk and a noteworthy tenth anniversary remind us that not all is wrong with the metal world.

I have no trouble admitting I have a total weakness for noting anniversaries of classic heavy metal records. As one with a great interest in the genre’s history, and like anyone else my age who has witnessed the musical form evolve right before our ears (if you can pardon the synesthesia), it’s important to recognize those recordings whose impact was the biggest—not to mention fun. And for nostalgia’s sake, those nice round numbers of 40, 30, 25, and 20 are good moments to do so, which you’ll see on this column as it goes along. In fact, there’s a big one coming in the next few weeks.


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