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by Jennifer Kelly

26 Jun 2015


“I was really into [nu-metal/post-hardcore producer] Ross Robinson and how he would be recording and throw a chair at somebody to get a more aggressive performance,” says Jasamine White-Gluz when asked about her influences for the new No Joy album, More Faithful. At the Drive In, whom White-Gluz cites, is a surprising touchstone for a band most often compared to shoegazers like My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive and whose third-full length clears the fuzz for a strikingly pop oriented sound. Yet White-Gluz says it was all about moving outside her comfort zone.

No Joy finished its latest album in an isolated farmhouse in Costa Rica, stuck for days on end without wifi or television. The farmhouse belonged to producer Jorge Elbrecht’s family, and while Elbrecht was no chair thrower, he did push White-Gluz and her fellow band members into surprising places.

White-Gluz, who asked her producer to make her uncomfortable recalls, “I would have to sing my vocals with no reverb and do them over and over again and in front of people. On the last record, I was singing in a dark room and alone and you couldn’t really see me. It made me uncomfortable.” By the end, she says, “I kind of regretted wanting him to push me, but, I asked for this.”

by Adrien Begrand

25 Jun 2015

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Adrien Begrand

“This song is about licking the blood of Christ’s cock while he’s up there dying!” Neil McAdams, bearded vocalist for Black Breath snarls, as the rest of the band launches into one of their many crusty, Entombed-derived “death ‘n’ roll” tunes. The small but exuberant crowd of people near the stage cheer in approval, heads banging, fists pumping, energy building, to the point where you know a pit will erupt sooner than later, which doesn’t always happen for an opening band.

by Rob Caldwell

25 Jun 2015


Some bands are the sum of their parts and nothing more: the individual musicians need to feed off each other to achieve good music. They need that chemistry of the players. Other bands are the opposite, featuring great solo musicians that don’t play well with others. Those bands don’t usually last long, as the music doesn’t gel or interpersonal conflicts cause the band to splinter.

It’s a rare band that achieves both ends of this spectrum, and Fleetwood Mac is one group who has somehow found a way to thrive artistically as a band while also spawning a plethora of creative solo works. (Granted, of course, that many of those solo works came from artists who left the band due to conflict.)

by Sloane Spencer

23 Jun 2015


Jacob Furr has been on our radar for a couple years, due to the surprisingly small world of Texas songwriters and Country Fried Rock alumni. Larry Hooper played Couch By Couch West and mentioned Furr, and then through our recent alumni, St. Paul and the Broken Bones, we were also connected via conversations about coffee. How does all of this relate to Furr’s new album, Trails & Traces? As Jacob profoundly says in our conversation, “We don’t live in a vacuum. None of us are doing this alone.”

by Ian King

22 Jun 2015


“When someone comes up and goes, ‘oh man, that was fucking great, you guys rocked’, you are just like, ‘oh, thanks a lot, that is really nice.’ But then this friend of mine… in San Francisco, I remember a couple years ago—this is totally one of the nicest compliments that anyone has ever said – he was like, ‘oh my god, you guys were playing and it was so confusing, I felt like I was walking around in circles smoking cigarettes the whole time.’
—Brian Girgus, Skyscraper, Summer 1999

The chances that Girgus’ friend was specifically talking about “Stairways”, the short instrumental track on Kill the Lights, are admittedly slim, but all the same, that is as apt a way as any to describe the mood of the song. It is also probably not a bad way to explain how a lot of lowercase’s music makes you feel.

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Anderson East Ignites a Fire at Mercury Lounge

// Notes from the Road

"Hot off the release of his album Delilah Anderson East's performance was full of vim and vigor.

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