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Wednesday, Jul 2, 2014
Just as Mötley Crüe kickstarts its legally-binding farewell tour, Sound Affects runs down the best songs by the kings of '80s Sunset Strip metal.

After 30-plus years of music, mayhem, and (to quote the group’s guitarist, Mick Mars) “more drama than General Hospital”, Mötley Crüe is finally hanging it up. Today marks the start of the band’s final tour, titled All Bad Things Must Come to an End. In a day and age where the phrase “farewell tour” holds as much water as a spaghetti strainer, all four original members of Mötley Crüe signed a legally binding document assuring fans that this was truly the end of the line and that the parting of ways will end the group on a high note.


“We always had a vision of going out with a big [expletive] bang and not playing county fairs and clubs with one or two original band members”, said drummer Tommy Lee.


While this dissolution of the band is amicable, there were a few times in its storied history where one or more members left Mötley Crüe in a huff. In 1992, singer Vince Neil left (whether he quit or was fired depends upon who is telling the story) and was supplanted by John Corabi. In 1994, Mötley Crüe made one album with Corabi on lead vocals before Neil returned in 1997. In 1999, it was Lee’s turn to leave to pursue solo projects. He was replaced briefly by the late great Randy Castillo (formerly a member of Ozzy Osbourne’s band), who succumbed to cancer shortly after joining. Former Hole drummer Samantha Maloney stepped in until Lee rejoined in 2004.


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Monday, Jun 30, 2014
The B-52's' opening salvo nicks Mancini, talks about aliens, and settled a bet I had with my dad on whether it was Kate Pierson's voice or a synth on that recording.

One of the first concerts I ever went to was where the Royal Crown Revue opened for the Pretenders, who opened for the B-52’s. While I was excited for the concert itself, it also served as a way to settle a bet me and my dad had: whether or not it was a synthesizer or either Kate Pierson’s/Cindy Wilson’s voice that served as the ominous opening wail to “Planet Claire”, the first track off of the B-52’s’ very first album.


We were both right, but my dad was still stunned at just how well Pierson’s warble went with the vintage synths that they used to create the B-movie atmosphere that proved so crucial to “Planet Clarie”‘s success. In Dance This Mess Around, our ongoing Between the Grooves feature tackling great albums track-by-track, we are looking at the opening salvo of one of the greatest pop albums ever made, and here taking on Athens, GA rockers the B-52’s and their eponymous debut.


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Friday, Jun 27, 2014
I can feel this week's album's energy from two planets away. I got my drink, I got my music, I will share it, but today I'm yelling. Yelling about a 2012 hip-hop breakthrough and the subject of this week's Counterbalance, that is.

Mendelsohn: We’ve covered a lot of ground in the last couple of years. But we have yet to talk about an album like Kendrick Lamar’s 2012 release Good Kid M.A.A.D. City. This album was ranked number two for the year, behind Frank Ocean’s Channel Orange, and currently sits at number 397 on the Great List (which seems unfairly low, but what do I know?). There is a cinematic quality to this record, one that exceeds even the best concept albums that rock ‘n’ roll had to offer — namely the Who’s Tommy and Pink Floyd’s The Wall. Those two albums seem almost silly in nature compared to the stark realities and self-awareness of Lamar’s vision. The incredible storytelling and unmatched lyricism has left me at a loss for words, Klinger. Where do you begin with an album as deeply layered as Good Kid M.A.A.D. City?  Hip-hop albums have been few and far between on the Great List, and while I enjoy hip-hop and am happy to see it slowly working toward its rightful position next to rock ‘n’roll on the List, I can’t help but feel completely overwhelmed by the breadth of material on this record.


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Thursday, Jun 26, 2014
For the first time since 1998, Australia's most recognizable music festival will not be on the schedule. In what appears to be an ever-expanding live music calendar, competition for headliners, audiences, and cash is only becoming fiercer and fiercer.

How unforunate it is that right as one storied music festival gets underway that another finds itself abruptly closing up shop. Just as England’s Glastonbury festival is busy attracting huge crowds to its part of the globe for a bill topped by Metallica, Arcade Fire, and Kasabian, way down under the people in charge of Australia’s Big Day Out have announced that they are canceling the event for next year.


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Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014
We've selected the top ten covers Tori Amos should consider performing on the US Leg of her Unrepentant Geraldines tour.

There are few musicians who possess the kind of flexibility and dexterity to change their setlists from night to night as much as Tori Amos does. Amos’ 2014 Unrepentant Geraldines tour is reviving an extremely clever gimmick she first debuted in 2005 during her Original Sinsuality tour: “The Lizard Lounge”. This cheeky moniker references Amos’ time spent playing covers requested in bars, often for tips, in Washington DC and Los Angeles before she broke through to a mainstream audience, great acclaim and much success for playing her own original music.


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