Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Hip-hop, R&B, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

 
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015
Even in bootleg form, the Clash's Rat Patrol From Fort Bragg stands as one of the most daring, fearless, idiosyncratic recordings ever put on tape by a major recording artist.

Combat Rock (1982) gave the Clash the commercial success in America that their rabid fanbase felt they deserved and critics had expected from them since their landmark record London Calling was universally heralded as the last great record of the ‘70s. (Depending on which side of the Atlantic you were on, it could have also been the first great record of the ‘80s.). Combat Rock’s first two singles, the funky new-wave boogie of “Rock the Casbah” and the sloppy power pop of “Should I Stay or Should I Go”, were performing exceptionally well, getting them plenty of airtime on MTV, a booking on Saturday Night Live, and a gig as the opening act on the Who’s 1982 comeback tour in arenas across the United States.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015
6 String Drag was a regionally beloved Southern roots rock band, who seemingly fell off the face of the earth at the top of their game. Bass player, Rob Keller, tells what happened and how they made it back.

Kenny Roby (previously featured here) and Rob Keller disbanded 6 String Drag at the top of their game, nearly 15 years ago. The first new album from 6 String Drag, Roots Rock N Roll, brings the group together again, ranging the gamut of roots rock with their brother-from-another-mother harmonies. Why would a regionally beloved band, seemingly at the peak of success, fall off the face of the earth? Love.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Feb 6, 2015
Oh, 191st most acclaimed album of all time, you let me violate you, you let me desecrate you, you let me penetrate you, you let me complicate you. A 1994 industrial bellwether is this week's Counterbalance.

Mendelsohn: If there was one album that could concisely sum up my musical taste as a teenager, it would be Nine Inch Nail’s The Downward Spiral. In 1994, I was wandering around the rock and roll wilderness, trying to find my way with nothing more than a couple of Rush records and a mixtape of Pink Floyd’s greatest hits. Then the video for “Closer” hit MTV and my world changed. A path opened up in the woods and I was shown the way into my rock and roll. I spent the next couple of years listening to The Downward Spiral record, along with the rest of the NIN archive, plus a myriad of less talented bands who were proffering the industrial rock that was fighting for ears in the mid ‘90s. None of it was as well thought out as Trent Reznor’s vision. Some of it was downright terrible (obligatory finger pointing at Marilyn Manson—not the worst, but a frequent and repeat offender). By the end of high school I had cut my long hair, boxed up the black t-shirts and acquired a marginally better taste in music. I would check in with Nine Inch Nails from time to time over the last decade but it seemed that aside from the ardent following Reznor had built for himself, there was little cultural currency left in the newer albums, as he drifted into an atmospheric approach that lent itself better to movie scores than rock albums.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Feb 5, 2015
Sailing the seven seas is a lot more fun when you're on a cruise ship with 60 metal bands and a legion of eager metal fans. No, really.

Longtime PopMatters readers might remember the original Blood and Thunder column, in which I wrote monthly thoughts about whatever was going on in heavy metal at the time. Started in 2005, it was one of the first columns on a music/pop culture site with this size and diversity of audience to devote serious writing to metal music, and it became a labor of love for yours truly. It came to an end in August 2011, but after three and a half years away, and with a new year upon us, it’s time to bring Blood and Thunder back.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015
It's one of the strangest pop microcosms in history: singles released exclusively from Greatest Hits compilations. We rounded 'em up and ranked 'em to find out what is truly the greatest Greatest Hit of all.

None of you reading this are greenhorns when it comes to “Greatest Hits” compilations. We all know the gamut: by creating a goto catalog release that will entice casual fans for years and decades to come, Greatest Hits/Best Of compilations are a reliable source of income for record labels and artists alike. We all snicker whenever an artist feels the need to tack on a “Volume One” onto that title, because unless you’re the Eagles or Billy Joel, you ain’t gettin’ a Volume Two, rest assured.


Now on PopMatters
Short Ends and Leader: Double Take: The Kid (1921)
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2015 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.