Latest Blog Posts

by Sloane Spencer

17 Jun 2015


Photo: Trish Badger

Folk Family Revival consists of three brothers and their buddy. The group is definitely moving towards psychedelic rock rather than straight-up folk with its sophomore album, Waterwalker, out now on Rock Ridge Music. With a homemade liquid light show from a visually talented friend, the luxury of regular studio access, and no external time constraints on recording, Folk Family Revival leaps into new territory. The songs continue to grow, both intentionally and for diverse audiences ranging from post-line dance classes in a legendary Texas roadhouse to sports bars, finding ways to keep audiences engaged and the music fresh.

by Carrington Wythe

17 Jun 2015


Photo: Tatiana Suri

A 20-Year Pregnancy

Slow Dakota’s 2013 concept album Bürstner and the Baby destroyed my faith in the music world. Not in a “I’ve just listened to a Nickelback album” kind of way; no, in a slow way, over time, as I finally came to understand what the album is about.

by Ian King

15 Jun 2015


“I can’t obsess / Over you anymore / I can’t confess / That I love you”

Let’s get the definition of “Neurasthenia” out of the way: “an ill-defined medical condition characterized by lassitude, fatigue, headache, and irritability, associated chiefly with emotional disturbance.” A serious case of “the sads”, then.

by Jason Mendelsohn and Eric Klinger

12 Jun 2015


Klinger: Few mainstream artists this side of the Eagles took as consistent a critical beating as Billy Joel. Throughout his career, critics have taken immense delight in razzing and belittling him. When he wrote polished ballads, they accused him of not knowing how to rock. When he’d record more rock material, they teased him for being a poser. The poor bastard just couldn’t win. Of course, part of the reason critics kept picking on Billy Joel was he made it so much fun for them. Joel would actually go so far as to read his bad reviews onstage, which had be a perverse delight for the writer who got that far in his head.

by Evan Sawdey

11 Jun 2015


Photo: Scarlet Page

The Darkness have, like their heroes AC/DC, withstood life’s hard knocks.

While everyone knows that their iconic 2003 hair-pop confection “I Believe in a Thing Called Love” will outlive most millennials, that overindulgent sophomore disc One Way Ticket to Hell… and Back sank most chances of the group rising above One Hit Wonder status. Frustrated, the group ventured off into other bands, with high-pitched vocalist Justin Hawkins trying his hand with the group Hot Leg, while guitarist Dan Hawkins and bassist Richie Edwards formed Stone Gods, both outfits releasing albums within a year of each other. Yet fate had other plans in store, and in 2012, the band released a long-awaited third disc, Hot Cakes, which contains what is arguably the greatest song they have ever done, “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us”.

With solid sales and a fanbase that never really left them, the band made their way out Valentia Island to record the aptly-titled Last of Our Kind, a disc which spends its time talking about barbarians and ancient conquests while still delivering the roaring riff rockers that have become their signature. As if that wasn’t enough, the group even crowdsourced some group vocals on the soaring title track to their fans, known as The Darkness Army, who were more than happy to comply.

To celebrate the disc’s release, Dan Hawkins took on PopMatters’ 20 Questions and revealed to us a love of Watership Down, Yves Saint Laurent, and why he’d want to take a peek at what’s going on in the year 3000.

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