Latest Blog Posts

by Sachyn Mital

27 Jan 2016


Last month, PopMatters hosted the premiere of The Stone Foxes’ live performance video for “This Town” from their September release Twelve Spells. The week before the premiere of their video, The Stone Foxes were in New York City for a sweaty, headlining show at the Mercury Lounge. They also visited a studio to record some tracks for the world wide web. We had a beer and hung out with the guys in between recording sessions and got to know them a little better. Drummer and singer Shannon Koehler co-founder the band with his guitarist/brother Spence and their friends, Brian “The Buffalo” Bakalian on bass, Vince Dewald on guitars and Ben Andrews on guitar and violin, round out the group.

by Evan Sawdey

21 Jan 2016


Photo: Tina Brindel

Maritime’s journey has been one of upsetting people’s expectations.

When the group was formed, the excitement of merging the members of the now-defunct Promise Ring (Davey bon Bohlen and Dan Didier) together with the then-finished Dismemberment Plan (bassist Alex Axelson) was enough to send the writer of your nearest indie-rock Blogspot into a spasm of delight. Yet the group’s first-ever set, Glass Floor, arrived in 2004 with a hushed murmur, as this new band was intent on exploring exploring mellower, acoustic textures that caught fans of both the Ring and the Plan off guard. Despite its somewhat muted reception, Glass Floor contained some rather lovely, beautiful moments, along with “Someone Has to Die”, a song that was soon picked up by The Onion’s A.V. Club as the soundtrack to their long-running Undercover series, which, in an intresting twist, was updated in later seasons to “It’s Casual”, off of 2011’s Human Hearts.

by Evan Sawdey

6 Jan 2016


Someone find Zachary Cale’s birthday candles, please.

No, it’s not for the fact that the Louisiana-bred, New York-based singer-songwriter is about to celebrate his 37th birthday here soon. It’s to commemorate a full decade since Outlander Sessions first arrived in the world, that scrappy little debut album that Zachary Cale famously recorded on a simple four-track with a guitar that actually wasn’t his. As great an origin story as it is, that 10-song wonder proved only to be a sign of things to come, as over the years, Cale’s own guitar mastery continued to grow, soon opening his albums up to more elaborate, flourishing productions, at one point even forming a full-band rock outfit called Illuminations just to take his songwriting to a different place.

by Evan Sawdey

8 Dec 2015


Casual fans refer to Widespread Panic as one of the last truly great jam bands, but in saying so, reveal why they are only casual fans. Only the devout know just how much farther Widespread’s musical grasp stretches.

As influenced as they were by gritty Southern rock music as they were with the more embryonic stylings of the Grateful Dead and The Band, this Athens, GA combo are going to celebrate a full three decades of existence next year, which is an accomplishment for any act, much less one like Widespread Panic, who’ve never had a radio hit to speak of, which, in many ways, is just the way they like it. Much like their ill-compared contemporaries like Umphrey’s McGee, the Panic built up their audience through touring, touring, and more touring, making each show an event in their own right, which is part of the reason that they have nearly as many live albums as they do studio recordings.

by Evan Sawdey

23 Nov 2015


!!!‘s biography runs like this: since releasing their first album in 2001, they’ve rocked and partied hard. End of story.

After coming into prominence with 2003’s instantly-iconic groove-jam “Me and Giuliani Down by the School Yard (A True Story)”, lead singer Nic Offer and his merry band of like-minded cohorts have moved away from their hardcore roots to become the de-facto dance-rock of the new millennium. Their songs groove, twist, and surprise, and even with a rotating group of regular members (to say nothing of the tragic passing of drummer Jerry Fuchs), they have slowly amassed an intensely devout cult following of the past decade and a half. Even with the success of “Giuliani”, the band has been touring and recording at a pretty consistent clip, often releasing one new album every three years, often shying away from the showboating controversies that so quickly sink other bands of the dance-rock contingent (whatever happened to, say, Black Kids?).

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Beyoncé and When Music Writing Becomes Activism

// Sound Affects

"The overall response to Beyoncé's "Formation" has been startlingly positive, but mostly for reasons attached to political agendas. It's time to investigate this trend.

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