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Monday, Sep 27, 2010
Stephen Rowland takes a look at every major release by the Pernice Brothers, ranging from the high points to the sleep-inducing lows.

In 1997, revered alternative country act the Scud Mountain Boys called it a day, and leader Joe Pernice (along, obviously, with his brother, Bob) quickly formed the Pernice Brothers, a group with a much less interesting name making decidedly more interesting music. Debuting on Sub Pop in 1998, Joe and Co. have been cranking out solid and often brilliant music for over a decade. This article examines and reviews all their major releases and hopefully gives insight into the songwriting evolution of the band, or more specifically, Joe Pernice. I feel it’s time we give them their due—they are by no means unknowns, but still fly a bit under the radar.


 

Pernice Brothers
Overcome By Happiness

Sub Pop (1998)
Rating: 5


Yeah, more like Overcome By NyQuil, as this record is the sonic equivalent to drool on a pillow. It’s so mellow it has fallen asleep. And it’s asleep so hard, it is almost comatose.


Now the actual Brothers Pernice’s prior group the Scud Mountain Boys had a similar sound, but there’s really nothing positive to say about them. If people were talking about them—which they weren’t—they were classifying the Scuds as an alternative-country band. I think not, unless Cat Stevens singing Burt Bacharach tunes is country. Or an alternative to that.


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Tuesday, Sep 21, 2010
From music to politics, the members of the Family Stand are fearless in their convictions.

Brooklyn residents didn’t know how lucky they were on the evening of September 8th.  Neither did Gothamites who took the No. 2 or 3 train to Atlantic Ave. and walked along the restaurant-studded sidewalks of Fifth Avenue in Park Slope to Southpaw. The evening’s attraction had traveled a collective 6,447 miles to perform one show. Without the promise of reappearing in New York (or anywhere else for that matter) anytime soon, the three members of the Family Stand walked out onstage to the sound of an adoring audience clearly thrilled to have the band back in its hometown.


The occasion for Sandra St. Victor, Peter Lord, and V. Jeffery Smith to unite for one night only was the release of In A 1,000 Years, their fifth studio album since first arriving on the scene as Evon Geffries and the Stand in 1987.  One inspired rechristening later, the Family Stand released Chain (1990), landed a number three R&B single with “Ghetto Heaven” and continued to saturate the airwaves with “In Summer I Fall”. Moon In Scorpio (1991) held listeners of progressive funk-rock rapt while also underscoring that the musical range of the Family Stand was not limited to such facile genre hyphenations. The terrain of their musicality was (and remains) vast, confounding an industry driven by categorization and commodification.


Tagged as: the family stand
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Tuesday, Sep 14, 2010
by Souleo
'PopMatters' speaks with Fountains of Wayne guitarist Jody Porter about his debut solo album, 'Close to the Sun'.

When you’re a musician who has spent the past 20 years existing safely within the circle of various bands, stepping out on your own brings no small amount of pressure. Jody Porter, guitarist for the power-pop group Fountains of Wayne, is feeling that pressure with the release of his debut solo album, Close to the Sun.


No longer able to hide within his former indie bands such as the Belltower, the Astrojet, or the previously mentioned Fountains of Wayne, Porter is adjusting to being front and center by focusing on what comes most naturally to him: making great music.


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Tuesday, Aug 17, 2010
The Books' samples, which include everything from bits and pieces of everyday noise to extended recordings of Hebrew stenography, are somehow more essential and more secondary at the same time -- used for their own sake to create something utterly unrelated.

For all their eclecticism and all their mixmanship, electronic duo Paul de Jong and Nick Zammuto, a.k.a. the Books, elude the label ‘DJs’.  The schizophrenic sonic adventure of their new album The Way Out evokes images of dusty crates of forgotten media and mad sound engineers doing experiments on inscrutable metal interfaces, but neither looks so familiar as they do emanating from contemporary hip hop classics like J Dilla’s Donuts or DJ Shadow’s Endtroducing… The samples feel different. They often land in the mix with a strange intensity, as though they carry the weight of their history a bit more conspicuously. And why shouldn’t they? The Way Out includes sounds and voices from sources as mundane as weight loss and self-help tapes.


Something more, however, than the stamp of unmitigated obscurity makes the Books’ samples distinctive, a quality magnified, though far from originated, on the new album. They are more assertive than the subjugated, ambient sounds of albums like the KLF’s Chill Out, more cohesive than the disruptive noises of outrageous producers like Lee Perry, and more purposeful than the exotic experiments of dissonant noise groups. They don’t contribute to a pastiche of styles or lend a flavoring of genre. Nor are they meant solely to illustrate a point or explain a lyric. The Books’ samples, which include everything from bits and pieces of everyday noise to extended recordings of Hebrew stenography, are somehow more essential and more secondary at the same time—used for their own sake to create something utterly unrelated.


Tagged as: the books
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Thursday, Aug 5, 2010
Enemies List record label founder Dan Barrett speaks with PopMatters on his band, Have a Nice Life, and his experience with home-recording, the resurgence vinyl records, and all-out war on the recording industry.

Since punk’s bricolage in the `70s, the anti-consumerist DIY ethic of self-reliance, self-production, and streetwise distribution has been an integral part of underground music, unchecked within the various “scenes” that have come to us as sub-genres and subtle variations on the themes that all that is indie has given us. This ideology, applicable now to everything from education to the Green Movement’s digs at urban gardening and organic lifestyle, seems most resolute, by way of sheer technology and perhaps owing to its genesis, in the realm of music production and recording.


And while the breadth of this aesthetic is perhaps immeasurable, it seems that DIY is something that Dan Barrett’s Enemies List record label, specializing in home-recorded music, is doing right and very well, releasing shoegaze, black metal, drone-y noise pop, some of it like the infant works of the Jesus And Mary Chain and M83 further wrought through a beautiful pedalboard. It’s a wonder someone from the Deftones hasn’t contacted them for work.


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