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Wednesday, Jul 16, 2014
Hot on the heels of the iconic metal group's new album Redeemer of Souls, Sound Affects combs through Priest's vast and astounding back catalog to round up its greatest tracks.

With Judas Priest back in the public spotlight, having just released an excellent, PopMatters-approved 17th studio album this past week called Redeemer of Souls, it had a lot of longtime listeners, including yours truly, revisiting the influential British metal band’s vast back catalog for sheer nostalgia’s sake. After a quick search of PopMatters’ many List This music entries, I couldn’t believe the mighty Priest hadn’t been covered yet. And if this is the first Judas Priest list to grace this site, why not start with the most obvious?


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Wednesday, Jul 9, 2014
Whether you're at the beach or just hanging out in the backyard, these timeless summer classics are sure to make the summer sun shine a little bit brighter.

Except for a couple, most of the picks on this list are at least 20 years old. It takes a while for a song to become timeless. In this case, listeners often need a few summers to absorb a song in order to begin relating to it as a seasonal staple.


While the list incorporates some songs that most listeners would immediately associate with summer, there are a few that speak of the season without being obvious. In an effort to make the collection as varied as possible, well-known songs are included as well as a few that have flown under the radar over the years. This means there are a lot of big summer hits (e.g.: “Cruel Summer“ by Bananarama, “Summer Breeze“ by Seals and Croft, anything by the Beach Boys, “Under the Boardwalk“ by the Drifters, etc.) left off the list in order to make room for some lesser-known gems.


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Wednesday, Jul 2, 2014
Just as Mötley Crüe kickstarts its legally-binding farewell tour, Sound Affects runs down the best songs by the kings of '80s Sunset Strip metal.

After 30-plus years of music, mayhem, and (to quote the group’s guitarist, Mick Mars) “more drama than General Hospital”, Mötley Crüe is finally hanging it up. Today marks the start of the band’s final tour, titled All Bad Things Must Come to an End. In a day and age where the phrase “farewell tour” holds as much water as a spaghetti strainer, all four original members of Mötley Crüe signed a legally binding document assuring fans that this was truly the end of the line and that the parting of ways will end the group on a high note.


“We always had a vision of going out with a big [expletive] bang and not playing county fairs and clubs with one or two original band members”, said drummer Tommy Lee.


While this dissolution of the band is amicable, there were a few times in its storied history where one or more members left Mötley Crüe in a huff. In 1992, singer Vince Neil left (whether he quit or was fired depends upon who is telling the story) and was supplanted by John Corabi. In 1994, Mötley Crüe made one album with Corabi on lead vocals before Neil returned in 1997. In 1999, it was Lee’s turn to leave to pursue solo projects. He was replaced briefly by the late great Randy Castillo (formerly a member of Ozzy Osbourne’s band), who succumbed to cancer shortly after joining. Former Hole drummer Samantha Maloney stepped in until Lee rejoined in 2004.


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Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014
We've selected the top ten covers Tori Amos should consider performing on the US Leg of her Unrepentant Geraldines tour.

There are few musicians who possess the kind of flexibility and dexterity to change their setlists from night to night as much as Tori Amos does. Amos’ 2014 Unrepentant Geraldines tour is reviving an extremely clever gimmick she first debuted in 2005 during her Original Sinsuality tour: “The Lizard Lounge”. This cheeky moniker references Amos’ time spent playing covers requested in bars, often for tips, in Washington DC and Los Angeles before she broke through to a mainstream audience, great acclaim and much success for playing her own original music.


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Wednesday, Jun 18, 2014
Dolly Parton was perhaps the first country mega-star, and the first to successfully cross-over into the world of pop music. Today, we celebrate her 10 finest achievements as a performer, plus another one that we simply couldn’t forget to mention.
11. “Islands in the Stream”
(Eyes That See in the Dark, 1983)


The reason this list is 11 songs and not a nice, round 10 is because of this one. It would be a sacrilege to leave out her biggest hit.


Written by the venerable Bee Gees, co-sung by Kenny Rogers, and destined for karaoke machines around the world, it’s a sparkling, lovey-dovey, pop monster as only the Brothers Gibb could write. It only makes it to the 11-spot on our list because Parton’s catalog of solo hits is just too rich on its own.


Longtime pals and collaborators, Rogers and Parton got together again this year to sing “You Can’t Make Old Friends” off of Blue Smoke


 
10. “Why’d You Come in Here Lookin’ Like That?”
(White Limozeen, 1989)


If you thought the phrase “painted-on jeans” was a recent country western ideal for women, think again. Way back in 1989, Parton used it to describe her cruel, flirtatious beau. And he looks seriously good in those things.


Though the song was written for her by two men, it still flips the script in an impressive way. It’s usually men who sing about women who can stop traffic during a night on the town, but Parton can’t peel her eyes off her dreamy cowboy. It’s a fun, lighthearted ode to jealousy in a way that is distinctly Dolly. The track’s upbeat, cut-time drive and happy, bouncing fiddle are enough to make you want to throw on some tight jeans and cowboy boots and cut a rug of your own.


 
9. “9 to 5”
(9 to 5 and Odd Jobs, 1980)


Who among us can’t sympathize? A ragtime piano drives away on a dark, major chord while Parton comes to grips with yet another day as a workaday wage slave. Country music is—or at least used to be—the balm of the working class. Her distinctive voice reminding you that “You’ve got a dream he’ll never take away” is about the sweetest medicine there is.


It’s impressive how Parton—who’s enjoyed a successful performing career since her teen years, maybe never working a 9 to 5 job in her life—can get away with performing this song with a straight face. But, as we’ll discover as this list unfolds, Parton’s warmth and sincerity is one of the keys to her appeal. You feel the conviction in her voice, which goes down as smooth and invigorating as the morning “cup of ambition” she describes in the first verse.


Oh, and the typewriter percussion is pure genius.


 
8. “Blue Smoke”
(Blue Smoke, 2014)


More than 45 years (!!) since her first top 10 Country single, “Blue Smoke”—the title track from her newest release—is pure, distilled, raw country. With bluegrass instrumentation and momentum, it trundles ahead like a locomotive, eager and earnest. You can hear her age manifesting itself in raspy, throaty tones when she sings first several lines—which only makes the song better. It lends itself well to a song about a long-suffering, mistreated lover who declares over the bridge, “I’ve had just about all the heartbreak I can stand!”


 
7. “Down From Dover”
(The Fairest of them All, 1970)


Today, it must be hard to believe that country music—with its rock and hip-hop collaborations, songs about beer, parties, trucks and more beer—used to be notoriously depressing. “Down From Dover” is old-school country, one of the darkest songs you’ll ever hear.


Parton’s warbling soprano mourns as she tells the tale of a young girl, pregnant and jilted by the father, is turned away by her family. With nowhere to turn and nothing to cling to but the hope her lover will return from Dover, the baby is a stillborn. And oh yeah, the father still isn’t coming home. Ouch.


“Down From Dover” is Parton’s songwriting at its most visceral, a story song in the country tradition that starts out sad and only becomes sadder. Her ability to paint the emotions of her protagonists is richly on display.



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