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by Scott Recker

6 Aug 2014


There’s definitely not a shortage of concert footage floating around. From esteemed directors to random people waving an iPhone in everyone’s face, there’s a ton of material to shift through, but, now that watching your favorite band live from behind a screen is so easy, there’s a question I’ve been thinking about a lot lately: what separates someone capturing a night when a band is on fire from a great concert documentary? Because there is a difference. And what bridges the gap is an underlying storyline. Some sort of innovative, emotional, or humanitarian connection that changes the way we think about, talk about, or listen to one or multiple performers. Something that makes it feel cinematic. Or stranger than fiction.

by Adrien Begrand

16 Jul 2014


With Judas Priest back in the public spotlight, having just released an excellent, PopMatters-approved 17th studio album this past week called Redeemer of Souls, it had a lot of longtime listeners, including yours truly, revisiting the influential British metal band’s vast back catalog for sheer nostalgia’s sake. After a quick search of PopMatters’ many List This music entries, I couldn’t believe the mighty Priest hadn’t been covered yet. And if this is the first Judas Priest list to grace this site, why not start with the most obvious?

by Jennifer Makowsky

9 Jul 2014


Except for a couple, most of the picks on this list are at least 20 years old. It takes a while for a song to become timeless. In this case, listeners often need a few summers to absorb a song in order to begin relating to it as a seasonal staple.

While the list incorporates some songs that most listeners would immediately associate with summer, there are a few that speak of the season without being obvious. In an effort to make the collection as varied as possible, well-known songs are included as well as a few that have flown under the radar over the years. This means there are a lot of big summer hits (e.g.: “Cruel Summer“ by Bananarama, “Summer Breeze“ by Seals and Croft, anything by the Beach Boys, “Under the Boardwalk“ by the Drifters, etc.) left off the list in order to make room for some lesser-known gems.

by Lana Cooper

2 Jul 2014


After 30-plus years of music, mayhem, and (to quote the group’s guitarist, Mick Mars) “more drama than General Hospital”, Mötley Crüe is finally hanging it up. Today marks the start of the band’s final tour, titled All Bad Things Must Come to an End. In a day and age where the phrase “farewell tour” holds as much water as a spaghetti strainer, all four original members of Mötley Crüe signed a legally binding document assuring fans that this was truly the end of the line and that the parting of ways will end the group on a high note.

“We always had a vision of going out with a big [expletive] bang and not playing county fairs and clubs with one or two original band members”, said drummer Tommy Lee.

While this dissolution of the band is amicable, there were a few times in its storied history where one or more members left Mötley Crüe in a huff. In 1992, singer Vince Neil left (whether he quit or was fired depends upon who is telling the story) and was supplanted by John Corabi. In 1994, Mötley Crüe made one album with Corabi on lead vocals before Neil returned in 1997. In 1999, it was Lee’s turn to leave to pursue solo projects. He was replaced briefly by the late great Randy Castillo (formerly a member of Ozzy Osbourne’s band), who succumbed to cancer shortly after joining. Former Hole drummer Samantha Maloney stepped in until Lee rejoined in 2004.

by Matt Mazur

25 Jun 2014


There are few musicians who possess the kind of flexibility and dexterity to change their setlists from night to night as much as Tori Amos does. Amos’ 2014 Unrepentant Geraldines tour is reviving an extremely clever gimmick she first debuted in 2005 during her Original Sinsuality tour: “The Lizard Lounge”. This cheeky moniker references Amos’ time spent playing covers requested in bars, often for tips, in Washington DC and Los Angeles before she broke through to a mainstream audience, great acclaim and much success for playing her own original music.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Emerging from My Hiatus from Big Budget Games

// Moving Pixels

"I'd gotten burned out on scope and maybe on spectacle in video games, but I think it's time to return to bigger worlds to conquer.

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