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by Sloane Spencer

19 May 2015


Photo: Gregg Roth

Lilly Hiatt released Royal Blue, to the surprise of fans of her singer-songwriter styled debut from a couple years ago. For those who have seen her live with her band, though, Royal Blue comes closer to catching Hiatt’s quirky, reflective, and trippy personality. Royal Blue moves forward, demonstrating her growth as an artist in her own right, finding her path, and doing so her way. With an honest, open discussion of the self-doubt necessary to create art and some songwriters who are catching her ear, Hiatt shares who she is in this conversation with Country Fried Rock.

by Evan Sawdey

18 May 2015


Photo: Dusdin Corden

Primrose Green is one hell of an insular folk album. It’s a disc less focused on satisfying the writer’s ego or existing purely on the basis of heartfelt confessionals as so many modern “folk” albums are; instead, it focuses on establishing its own universe, one where psychedelic textures mix in with delicately finger-picked guitars, creating something sonically unique but also entirely self-contained. Primrose Green is a universe unto itself, and it’s for that reason that so many people are talking about its creator, Ryley Walker.

by Jason Mendelsohn and Eric Klinger

15 May 2015


Klinger: Make no mistake, popular music in the 20th century was split nearly down the middle with the advent of rock and roll. And the result was something like a street brawl, fought out in the newspaper columns and nightclub stages and dining room tables of America. The old guard took every opportunity to take potshots at this new, sexually/morally/ethnically ambiguous form, while the youngsters bobbed and weaved their way through the whole skirmish, confident that they’d at least end up winning the war of attrition. That’s the official story at least, and it’s not without its truths. But too many people, musician and critic alike, took the whole thing a little too literally, and as a result the age of rock criticism hasn’t done much more than pay lip service to the music that came before the Great Divide.

by Adrien Begrand

14 May 2015


Photo: Volbeat

I’m at a Volbeat show, hanging back behind the mixing board, leaning on the rail, absorbing the garish spectacle of the Danish band’s new cowboy-themed stage show. Out of my line of sight, a big, sweaty arm suddenly slides around my shoulder, and I’m subjected to a gigantic hug by a gleefully tipsy man who’s quite a bit bigger than me. I’m not the most overtly social fellow most of the time, but invade my space, and I get snippy—inwardly snippy, anyway, as we introverts usually are. I just reply back with a polite smile and feigned laugh, though I’m staring daggers at the guy.

by Sloane Spencer

12 May 2015


Sam Lewis first crossed our radar on a video from Music City Roots, but the timing was off to feature him on the show. As Lewis has toured more in the United States and the United Kingdom, he has built a following and honed his songs, yielding a his new Waiting On You album, recorded with some of Music City’s Americana elite at an historic studio, Southern Ground (recently purchased by Zac Brown). When folks like Brandon Bell champion you to Darrell Scott, Will Kimbrough, Mickey Raphael, Gabe Dixon, and the McCrary Sisters, then you know that your record will sparkle.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Pop Unmuted Podcast: Resilience, Melancholy, and Rihanna's "American Oxygen" with Dr. Robin James

// Sound Affects

"Pop Unmuted talks to Dr. Robin James about her book Resilience and Melancholy: Pop Music, Feminism, Neoliberalism and Rihanna's latest hit "American Oxygen".

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