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Monday, Jun 1, 2009
The soul savior who makes you feel like rock 'n roll is still exciting.

When King Khan AKA Black Snake AKA The Maharaja of Soul, and his Shrines take the stage, there’s an unmistakable excitement in the air. As the lights dim and the droning, mystic music fades in with endless fog and smoke, it seems as if a wizard is mounting the stage. When the lights turn on and front and center is a man wearing a cheetah print sports coat and a feather head dress, carrying some sort of voodoo shaman’s cane, you know it’ll be a show not quite like anything you’ve seen, and it is.


Starting off with “Land of the Freak”, King Khan and the Shrines immediately won over the crowd, every band member seeming 100% into the music and completely genuine in their excitement. Khan as a front man is perfect: rock n roll sneer, soul moves, warm and witty banter and total devotion to the live show. Jumping in and out of the crowd all night, Khan and the guitarist and bassist seemed really excited to be playing and never missed a beat; everything sounded perfect.


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Thursday, May 28, 2009
by PopMatters Staff
Paul Noonan, the lead singer for Ireland's Bell X1, drops by 20 Questions and tells us why the Beatles killed music.

1. The latest book or movie that made you cry?
I tend to be moved to tears by movies or TV shows a lot more easily in the last couple of years than I used to. I’ve only recently watched The West Wing, at which I cried a lot at the moving speeches -– it was practice for the real thing I suppose. I cried at a recent movie about the hunger strikes in northern Ireland called Hunger. And I cried at The Wrestler.


2. The fictional character most like you?
Oh man, I dunno… maybe a little Ignatius J. Reilly, mostly because I love his name.


3. The greatest album, ever?
Is not Sgt. Pepper’s... In fact, this record killed music. Before this, bands knew what they were doing before going into the studio, and laid it down quick, bish bash bosh. These upstarts decided “to use the studio as an instrument” and spawned decades of bands fluting around, sticking microphones in toilets…and no songs. Ergo, the Beatles killed music.


4. Star Trek or Star Wars?
My only interest in Star Trek is for those armpit-hugging tops. I enjoyed Star Wars pre ’84, as they were an integral part of my early cinema going and all the joy that this has brought. I had an audio tape of The Empire Strikes back, as it was apparently “too scary” for me to see.


Tagged as: 20 questions, bell x1
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Wednesday, May 27, 2009
After a rash of solo albums, film scores, and an infamous incident doing the theme to a noted TV show, Clem Snide frontman Eef Barzelay is back, his band in tow, and unafraid to face his future.

It would be easy to say that Eef Barzelay has brokered a Faustian bargain for himself—if only he got something out of it in the end.


Barzelay—the frontman for lauded indie-country act Clem Snide—has a cool demeanor, and in talking to him, it is clear that he has given his soul to what he does. Yet outside of some acclaimed independent records (both leading Clem Snide and as a solo artist) and some notable film scores, it seems that he doesn’t have much to show for it. However, Barzelay and his band are not discouraged in the least.  With their name culled from a character from one of America’s foremost outcast artist—William S. Burroughs—Clem Snide is a bit character.


“I am embarrassed to have that reference in the name,” Barzelay says shortly after we start chatting.  He is at home in Nashville with a five month old child on his shoulder, a new record with his old band just out, and a tour looming in the very near future. “I always make these big decisions that I don’t think about. We had a tape [of Burroughs] and if you listen to him read his stuff is hysterical.  It opened with ‘my name’s Clem Snide and I’m a private asshole,’ and I thought that sounds like me.”


When you start to dissect the long and winding road that is the Clem Snide biography, it all traces back to Barzelay’s voice.  It isn’t your traditional singing voice.  It has a whine pitch that is more about emotional exhaustion than it is weakness.  It’s equal parts River Cuomo’s sarcasm, Daniel Johnston’s sadness and Mark Oliver Everett’s attention to detail.  For a time, it was also the most recognizable voice in a small indie circle defined by recognizable voices.  Clem Snide was able to glide between genres like pop and alt-county with relative ease. It was the kind of voice that you would hear through the doors of dormitories and on the far end of music dials.  Truly, it had the potential to be the voice of a decade.


Snide got what they thought was a great break when they were picked to do the theme song for television show Ed in its second season.  Unfortunately, the fan base from Ed reacted poorly to the replacement of the original Foo Fighters version of the song.  “I was reading this Stuckeyville.org fucking message board or whatever,” says Barzelay, “and there were all these people with letters saying ‘what is this song, it’s like someone torturing a Yak.’  Just vitriolic shit. Man, they love[d] that Foo Fighters song. No one was too pleased with the way [our song] turned out.”  It appeared once again that fame would slip through Clem Snide’s fingers.


Then Clem Snide abruptly called in quits. “Ultimately, it was a falling out with me and the guitar player and that was in conjunction with a really nasty break up with our manager.  For me to announce that it was broken up was probably an emotional reaction.  Technically I started Clem Snide in 1991 and we didn’t make a record until 1997.”  After a few notable releases, the dynamic in Clem Snide dissolved; losing a label and a booking agent in a short time span and all that was left was a lot of ideas for songs and that remarkable voice. Eef Barzelay was not unaware that his voice alone was worth something.  So Clem Snide called it quits with a catalogue that included notable albums like You Were a Diamond,Your Favorite Music, Soft Spot,End of Love, Ghost of Fashion, and the successful Beautiful EP (featuring a cover of the Christina Aguilera song of the same name). It was a respectable discography and could have been the last of the band.  Fortunately, Eef Barzelay was not finished.


Barzelay knew that he had more to write, so he relocated to Nashville and embarked on a solo career. Left in the vaults, however, was an unfinished record that Barzelay had strong feelings about.  As he mulled this, a unique opportunity was presented to Barzelay: he was asked to score a small film called Rocket Science. It was a small budget quirky film about a boy with a stutter who attempts to overcome the problem by joining the debate team at his New Jersey.  Though Barzelay knocked the project out of the park, once again his timing was off.  Barzelay notes that despite the momentum the film had, “We opened the same weekend and Superbad and that sorta killed us at the box office.”  Nonetheless, Rocket Science was a critical darling and has become a cult favorite.  In addition to being an unforgettable voice of the new generation he was now also a film scorer. With the time left over in the sessions for Rocket Science, Barzelay dug out that project he had been working on. The difference was, this wasn’t going to be a solo record.  This was, definitively, a Clem Snide record.  Water had gone under the proverbial bridge and it was time to put the band back together.  So 2009 sees the release of a new Clem Snide record, made on a movie’s dime and featuring front and forward that voice.


Hungry Bird sounds like an AC Newman record peppered with abstract lyrics like “we have their bones to comb our hair”, Barzelay’s voice appearing to be beamed in from some outer planet.  The title track is more poetry wordplay than traditional rock number. In fact, much of the record has the feel of lyrics detached from the relentlessly atmospheric.  Clem Snide has expanded into Wilco-sized level of musical experimentation but without the noted histrionics. The blend of the two side by side feel inspired.


“I make music sort of from the inside out which is different than most indie music is made today. It’s about my voice and my words and if you listen to it and try to compare to My Morning Jacket or a Shins record, it’s great. There is a sophistication to it that is great.  We are not that. Clem Snide is supposed to be confrontational and that’s the punk part that is missing in indie music right now.”


It is hard to see where the future of Clem Snide may lead. The band seems to agree that touring places a burden on them. Barzelay is now the father of two young children and the notion of months away from his family sits uneasily with him.  Nonetheless, the band have hit the road to promote Hungry Bird, playing just like they did during their early days.  The film scoring business seems to be picking up for Barzelay, and—as such—he is afforded more choices than to load into a van and travel thousands of miles to remind fans what the voice of a movement sounded like. On the other hand, Rivers Cuomo and Eddie Vedder have found ways to do it and perhaps Clem Snide can too.  If Hungry Bird is any indication, it would be worth all of our times if the men of Clem Snide do just that.  Maybe Barzelay did make a Faustian bargain: he has his family, his fans, and—of course—he has that voice. 


And Ed has been cancelled.


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Tuesday, May 26, 2009
by PopMatters Staff
Former drug store clerk Elliott Yamin scored high on the American Idol charts. His first album, Elliott Yamin (Hickory, March 2007) went gold in the US and Japan, and was the highest independent debut for a new artist on the Billboard charts. His sophomore album, Fight for Love, released this month.

1. The latest book or movie that made you cry?
Tuesdays With Morrie.  It’s a great story about finding yourself and what really matters in life.


2. The fictional character most like you?
Don’t really know any fictional characters, or at least followed any. So I don’t really know what each one does or stands for.  Never really got into any animated shows or cartoons.


3. The greatest album, ever?
Donny Hathaway’s i>These Song For You Live!’. Stevie Wonders’ Signed, Sealed and Delivered and Marvin Gayes’ I Want You album are tied for a close second place!


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Saturday, May 23, 2009
Pete Townshend is selling (his soul), but who's buying? Not I.

There is a reason the Beatles are considered the greatest band ever. It’s simple, really: they are the greatest band ever. After them, it’s a fair fight for second place, and fans of the Rolling Stones, the Who, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and the Kinks can duke it out for eternity. (And that’s just the British bands.) It would not be terribly enjoyable, or edifying, to argue about which band warrants consideration as runners-up, but since the Stones tend to be the ones most often considered just under the Fab Four’s thumbs, how about the Who? Who knows what might have happened if Keith Moon had not kicked off for that great pub in the sky? (Based on what these other bands did, or did not do, after 1980, it’s safe to propose nothing terribly earth shattering was portended.)


But the output from their first decade goes toe-to-toe with any of these other bands’ best work. And if you want to go deep, what tri-fecta can possibly touch Tommy, Who’s Next and Quadrophenia? In terms of albums released in a row, that is a tough list to top. The Stones, of course, came close with Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile on Main Street (and in terms of the immediate precursors, I would personally rank The Who Sell Out as every bit as good, if not slightly better, than the somewhat overrated Beggar’s Banquet). What else do you got? I wouldn’t fight to the death arguing that Rubber Soul, Revolver and Sgt. Pepper aren’t the most important (if least perfect) consecutive albums to drop in rock history. Of course there is also the entirety of Hendrix’s studio output (while he lived, that is; the good, the bad and the ugly that still spills out of the vaults is a mostly positive mixed blessing), Are You Experienced?, Axis: Bold As Love and Electric Ladyland. Fans of the underdogs will get plenty of mileage endorsing The Kinks’ Face to Face,  Something Else by the Kinks and The Village Green Preservation Society.


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