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Thursday, Mar 13, 2014
The man who sampled the Clash's "Straight to Hell" for M.I.A. teams up with his heroes and Frank Ocean to bring summer to your speakers a few months early.

Now here’s a pleasant surprise. A few days ago the Converse sneaker company unveiled a collaboration between producer Diplo, R&B it-boy Frank Ocean, and Clash members Mick Jones and Paul Simonon as the latest offering in its “Three Artists, One Song” single series. There have been eight previous installments in the series—all of which I have admittedly glossed over—but something primal about seeing those names in the marquee made me want to immediately investigate the results.


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Thursday, Feb 27, 2014
For the second month of 2014, we have big comebacks from B.A.P., Sunmi, CNBlue, and Girls' Generation! The music videos give us everything from sexy vampire dancing to broken mirrors, to extended mockumentaries. But how do the songs hold up against the exciting first month of the year?

After the exciting start to the year, K-pop calmed down a bit in February. But despite the smaller amount of big releases, there were definitely some stand-out songs, so let’s check out a few:


 

B.A.P. - “1004 (Angel)”


After debuting in January of 2012, six-member boy band B.A.P. (Best Absolute Perfect) has finally released its first full-length album, First Sensibility. The lead single from the album, “1004 (Angel)”, came out on February 3rd and remained one of the most interesting songs/videos throughout the whole month. The song is more of a rock/pop style for the group, which tends to lean towards EDM and hip-hop, but it works surprisingly well for the boys, who really get to show off their vocals here. “1004 (Angel)” is a melodramatic song of lost love, with lyrics like “The reason I live is you” running throughout. But with its infectious hook and dance rhythm, it’s hard to not enjoy.


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Tuesday, Feb 4, 2014
It was a big month K-pop, with comebacks from Rain, TVXQ, B1A4, Dal*Shabet, AOA, Girl's Day, and more, as well as premieres by Rainbow Blaxx, Kiss&Cry, and others. If these songs are anything to go by, 2014 is going to be another big year for the Korean musical style.

For western pop, January is usually a slow month. Most big acts wait for later in the year to drop big singles or albums, but in K-pop, January is the time to set the stage for the rest of the year. In 2013, Girls’ Generation kicked things off with its incredible “I Got a Boy” video on January 1st. So far this year, we’ve seen major comebacks from Rain, TVXQ, B1A4, Dal*Shabet, AOA, Girl’s Day, and more, as well as premiers by Rainbow Blaxx, Kiss&Cry, and others. After Psy’s “Gangnam Style”, 2013 was K-pop’s year to be recognized internationally, and it certainly succeeded. But that means that 2014 will be even more important: can K-pop continue to hold the West’s attention? Can it continue to get support, new fans, and media coverage? Or will it go out with the other fads? If the songs released in January are anything to go by, K-pop is here to stay, and 2014 is off to a great start.


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Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013
Whether you understand his music or not, Stetson's work is undeniably powerful -- a walled-in chamber of voluptuous white noise in which the artist holds the addressees of his wayward signals captive. He speaks to PopMatters about his new album, his 100-year-old sax, and more.

Call it uneasy listening.


Colin Stetson has not made the listening experience of his music easy for his audiences. But what Stetson has accomplished is bringing his brand of jazz to a wider mass that may have overlooked the genre, perhaps dismissing it as marginal music. Though he is quick to point out that his music is not exclusively jazz, his work is infused with the wisdom of the jazz greats that came before him: free jazz pioneers like Anthony Braxton, Sam Rivers, and Evan Parker seem to be points of reference. Yet the gripping tonalities in his music, while never even grazing the outer perimeters of pop music still share the immediacy of pop.


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Monday, Aug 19, 2013
With the announcement of Juana Molina’s upcoming album, Wed 21, an unexplainable excitement grew inside of me.

If you are from Argentina, then you must have heard at least once from Juana Molina, especially if you’re also called Juana, like me. I remember that every time a friend’s mother saw me, she used to tell me: “Here comes Juana and her sisters!” Only two years ago I found out that she wasn’t referring to my real sisters, but to Juana Molina’s old TV show, Juana y sus hermanas.


I still can’t remember when or why I was once interested to listen to her music, but I know that my admiration towards her has only increased since then and that, no matter how cliché this phrase is, her music speaks to me like no other. Although many artists use looping, her songs are different for depending on it while still being able to sound organic. Her electro-folk is both serene and eccentric, while her voice can be soft but also hypnotizing in order to fuse with the rest of the instruments (which are all recorded by herself in her house) and become another one.


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