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by Evan Sawdey

21 Jun 2010


Photo: Pat Pope

Justin Currie has had one of the most extraordinary second acts one could ever have in a career.

The first act was simple: the Scottish-born singer-songwriter formed a band called Del Amitri with friend Iain Harvie in the early ‘80s, focusing on a power pop sound that resonated well in their homeland, the group soon scoring a seemingly never-ending string of hits in the UK, all while the duo cycled through quite a few members during their two-decade existence. Although the group was moderately successful in their homeland and developed quite the cult audience stateside, it wasn’t until 1995 when the group’s insanely catchy track “Roll to Me” became a Top 10 hit in the U.S., quickly becoming the one thing that the group is immediately identified with even up to this day. Subsequent albums failed to capitalize on the group’s popularity stateside, and after 2002’s Can You Do Me Good?, the group became relatively quiet.

Yet in 2007, Currie re-emerged as a solo artist, and his disc What Is Love For was released to huge levels of acclaim, many people even gravitating towards Currie’s melancholic tunes without having much if any knowledge of his power-pop past. Suddenly Currie was courting a brand-new audience, and feeling reinvigorated about his own career.  With this year’s The Great War, however, Currie has taken a great leap forward with his songwriting, as highlighted by the eight-minute epic “The Fight to Be Human”, one of his most blistering and ultimately cathartic tracks to date. 

Following in that same vein, Currie recently sat down to answer PopMatters’ 20 Questions, and in doing so reveals which Spinal Tap character he is most like, which political figure he would not mind murdering, and how an A&R rep once gave him some of the best advice he ever received ...

by Evan Sawdey

18 Jun 2010


On paper, the pairing of Christy & Emily almost seems like the setup for a joke: one girl (Emily) is a classically-trained pianist who graduated from Oberlin College, the other (Christy) a California-bred rock guitarist who wound up playing in multiple New York indie outfits. When they finally meet up, however, it’s not a non-stop collision of wackiness that was filmed in front of a live studio audience. Instead, it’s a collection of remarkably sweet, understated indie-pop wherein the emotional power lies within the sheer economy of their arrangements.

The pair’s new album is aptly titled No Rest, which makes sense given that following the release of Gueen’s Head (2007), the duo toured relentlessly, joined up with Effi Briest for even more musical collaborations, and worked quite relentlessly on its moody yet potent new disc. Tracks like “Here Comes the Water Now” exude a gray cloud sky sort of idleness, while tracks like the more propulsive “Beast” show that the group still can display some biting rock when it needs to, and yet still make all its stylistic detours sound like they’re coming from the same place.

by Henry Guyer

17 Jun 2010


I forget sometimes, sitting in my little studio apartment, the lives that go on directly beyond my four whitewashed walls. Then, later on, leaning over the balcony the first day the sun makes its remarkable summer comeback, I meet my neighbors for a short conversation that lasts just as long as our encounters in the hallway or in the elevator. Alone, I wonder what they are really like. What they do and what they think; how they survive and make sense of everything.

I imagine that this is what Charles Spearin (founding member of Do Make Say Think and multi-instrumentalist for Broken Social Scene) must have thought many times before he started The Happiness Project. Simply put, The Happiness Project uses the inflections of ordinary human speech as a springboard to compose music. On the surface, it is music and performance art, but beneath the sounds lurks a microcosm of modern urban life.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

16 Jun 2010


The Mates of State story is one of collaboration—in life as well as together as members of a band since 1997. The husband-wife duo of Jason Hammel and Kori Gardner released a new CD of covers called Crushes (The Covers Mixtape) on June 15th. Before setting off on a tour of over 25 dates with a traveling show of magic, sword swallowers, contortionists and the like, Hammel took the time to talk to PopMatters. With the sounds of a toddler and kids playing in the yard in the background, the conversation started by discussing how the Connecticut suburbs can be a great place to raise a family whether you’re in a band or just a fan.

You met in Kansas, moved together to San Francisco and then settled in the Connecticut suburbs. Why here?
Kori actually grew up in Connecticut so her family is here.  When we were living in San Francisco, we were like, “Man, we love it here, but are we staying here forever or are we going to try to move around a bit more? Well, let’s go to the East Coast and try to get as close to New York City as we can and be close to Kori’s family”, since we thought we were going to have a kid or two and that would be helpful.

by Evan Sawdey

15 Jun 2010


Discovered by Of Montreal and yet embracing their own sort of joyous electro-pop sound, Casiokids may be the hottest dance act currently out of Norway.  Although that statement might seem to be a bit insular, given that both Datarock and Annie have emerged from the same Bergen scene that this quintet have, that’s quite the statement indeed.

Having petered out one tantalizing single after another in Europe while wowing audiences with their shadow puppet-filled, often downright goofy live show, it wasn’t long before labels began taking interest, and only recently did Topp stemning på lokal bar—their vibrant debut album—finally get a Stateside release, all without making any sort of concession to rerecord the songs in English, instead merely giving the tracks a small studio revamp to potentially make them even catchier than they are now (as if that were possible!).

Although the group retains a slight aura of mystery around them, bassist Kjetil Bjøreid Aabø took some time to set us straight by answering PopMatters’ famed 20 Questions, revealing a love for all things Pet Sounds, why he holds Smurf-related merchandise over that of Star Wars toys, and how the only tough decision he’d have to make is choosing a favorite film director: Woody Allen or Werner Herzog ...

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20 Questions: Rachael Yamagata

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"After a four year break since her last album, Rachael Yamagata reveals a love of spreadsheets, a love for Streisand, and why it's totally OK to suck at playing guitar.

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