CFP: The Legacy of Radiohead's 'The Bends' 20 Years On [Deadlines: 4 Feb / 19 Feb]

 
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Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015
“Martin, maybe one day you’ll find true love." ABC's sumptuous critique of romance is a masterful blend of disco, New Wave pop, and golden age Hollywood glamor.

Dance music is often accused of seemingly prizing escapist content over substance. That’s a critique based upon faulty expectations. “Substance”, that very thorny, very rockist notion tied to overall determinations of worth, is honestly not often required in such music. Dance music, after all, has a very basic goal it must achieve, and anything beyond facilitating a good time on the dancefloor is an expendable bonus.


However, that doesn’t mean dance music has to sacrifice intelligence or wit, or lyricism more nuanced than the most primal exaltations. Martin Fry’s excellence as a wordsmith is a hefty reason why I enjoy his band ABC’s 1982 album The Lexicon of Love so much. Though it lacks the gargantuan and obtuse experiments typically associated with concept albums, The Lexicon of Love is most assuredly such a specimen, for every aspect of its being is employed in the service of Fry’s bitter deconstruction of modern romance.


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Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014
Thirty years later, Soul Mining remains The The's most vital work.

Of all the intense young men making art from angst in the UK post-punk/New Wave scene of the mid-80’s, The The‘s Matt Johnson was perhaps the fiercest. Exhibiting a near-pyromaniacal obsession with images of hell and burning, this was a man who seemed to make music from inside the flames of his own private purgatory.


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Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014
Ten years after the release of A Ghost Is Born, the songs still just aren't there.

Ultimately, Wilco‘s A Ghost Is Born is a disappointment.


I should clarify. A Ghost Is Born is a disappointment not because it’s worse than Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, which was easily one of the best albums of 2002 and which was, for me (and for I imagine tons of others after Pitchfork gave it a perfect score) the entry point to the band. That line of thought definitely does not need to be pursued.


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Thursday, Jan 9, 2014
Perhaps because it represented his formation as a solo artist, his manifestation of “Lou Reed”, as opposed to “Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground”, Reed owned the '70s more than any other decade.

Lou Reed was one of those stranger-artists whose life, health, and death interested and affected me greatly. As I spent several years listening to pretty much nothing else but the Velvet Underground and, even more, Reed’s solo work (a duration of which a friend said to me, “God, that must’ve been depressing”), I’ve felt closer to Reed than perhaps any other artist, musical or otherwise. He just seemed to speak a language I wanted hear, simply and effectively.


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Wednesday, Jul 17, 2013
Some 25 years ago, Q Lazzarus' sole hit, the hypnotic dance-thump that is "Goodbye Horses", soundtracked a fairly popular Jonathan Demme movie. Amazingly, it wasn't Silence With the Lambs. With an anniversary vinyl release upon us, we dig up even more facts about this glorious pop anomaly ...

It’s hard to believe that over some 25 years ago, Q Lazzarus’ sole hit, the strangely entrancing thump of “Goodbye Horses”, was featured quite prominently in a well-received movie. That movie, of course, was Married to the Mob.


Wait, is that right?


Actually it is. Years before “Goodbye Horses” soundtracked one of the most unique scenes in cinema history during Silence of the Lambs, the song found quite a home in the Michelle Pfeiffer vehicle Married to the Mob. Even these decades down the line, still not much is known about the mysterious chanteuse Q Lazzarus aside from the fact that she worked as a taxi driver prior to being discovered as a singer (she later went on to have minor singing parts in films like Something Wild and Philadelphia, but almost entirely disappeared after that). To celebrate the anniversary of the release, “Goodbye Horses” is being put out on limited-edition vinyl via Mon Amie records, the a-side featuring Q Lazzarus’ original rendition, the b-side being a remarkably astute, considered cover of the song by Wild Beasts’ Hayden Thrope and Jon Hopkins.


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