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by AJ Ramirez

29 Aug 2009


Guitarist and chief songwriter Noel Gallagher has quit Britpop survivors Oasis, reportedly due to an “altercation” just before the group was set to take the stage at the Rock en Seine festival in Paris, France, on Friday night. According to a statement he posted on the band’s website, Gallagher said he “could not go on” working with vocalist/younger brother Liam Gallagher a single day longer. Despite the suddenness of the split, the news would carry a far greater impact if Gallagher hadn’t done the same thing several times before, only to rejoin soon thereafter.

Gallagher has exited Oasis over disagreements with his brother so often it has become a running joke. The first such incident occurred following a September 1994 concert in Los Angeles, California, where Noel took exception to Liam’s drug-fueled stage antics and subsequently fought his kin backstage.  The siblings made up shortly thereafter; meanwhile Noel was inspired by his post-breakup exodus to Las Vegas to write the strong Oasis b-side “Talk Tonight”. Noel left the group again in May 1995 during the production of (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?; this incident involved an in-studio showdown between cricket bat-wielding Noel and a furniture-tossing Liam.  The elder Gallagher’s next exit came in 1996 at the height of his band’s popularity, when he opted to return home to the UK in the midst of an increasingly disappointing American tour. Despite brief talk of continuing the tour without their leader, Liam and the rest of the band shortly returned to Britain, where the Gallaghers duly patched things up amid a media panic.  In the new millennium, Noel made another mid-tour exit in 2000, allegedly precipitated by his brother’s rude comments about his wife.

It is possible that Noel Gallagher has finally had it with his brothers behavior and could not longer carry on in Oasis In interviews in recent years, Noel has painted a picture of Liam as a stubborn, inconsiderate loudmouth who calls at four in the morning just to berate him (in contrast, Liam is not above chastising his brother in the press as well). Still, given the elder Gallagher’s past behavior, post-mortems on the life of Oasis are premature. If Noel Gallagher has not returned to the group in six months’ time, then readers can surely expect an Oasis career retrospective by this author here at Sound Affects. Until then, wait and see if he cools off a bit.

by Sarah Zupko

18 Aug 2009


Richard Thompson - Walking on a Wire: Richard Thompson (1968-2009)
The best box set of the past few months has nothing to do with Woodstock. Walking on a Wire covers the length of Thompson’s rich and varied career, beginning with his days in the influential folk-rock group Fairport Convention and continuing through his work with his wife Linda and into the solo career that continues unabated to this day. Equally revered as a songwriter and guitarist, Thompson is one of the true legends of the 1960s.

Joe Henry - Blood from Stars
Eclectic singer-songwriter Joe Henry offers up a compelling blend of decidedly adult music on his 11th solo release. As always, his music won’t be confined by genre definitions, but suffice it to say, his work has a blues hue and a jazz sensibility. The album also marks the debut of Henry’s son Levon on saxophone. Levon has snagged two soloist awards already from the Monterey Jazz Festival’s honors given to young musicians.

by Omar Kholeif

28 Jul 2009


Recently dubbed the new “princess of Pop”, Rolling Stone has said that Lady Gaga is on the verge of being the “defining Pop Star of the year”, and earlier offered her the cover of the coveted annual Hot List Edition. The honour is arguably a well-deserved one, considering that the singer’s ‘80s flavoured dance songs have been smash hits across both sides of the pond—helping secure the former cocaine-addict a devoted fan base.

Personally, it isn’t Gaga’s music that I find most intriguing. Rather, it is her dramatic rise, and her unabashed obsession with fame and her penchant for discussing it. Surely, the title of her first album, The Fame professes this explicitly, while Brian Hiatt’s report in RS reveals that the young starlet is a workaholic, who is devoted to the continued rise of her stardom. These musings were interspersed with quips by Gaga who regaled readers with stories about “kissing girls” and how she “doesn’t look like the other perfect pop singers”, i.e. she aims to surprise with her lack of convention.

Pop music aficionados will note that there is nothing particularly fresh about Gaga’s approach. We all know how Madonna exploited the minds of the MTV generation, and that her sole intent at the time was (arguably) to usurp convention, through reinvention.

by Sarah Zupko

23 Jun 2009


Where last week was a major drought, save for some stellar Americana from Ha Ha Tonka, this week is an embarrassment of riches. Even records that wind up being a disappointment like Mars Volta’s latest are still worth a listen or two. The week is packed with the sort of stuff that makes indie fans salivate (Sunset Rubdown, Dinosaur Jr., Tortoise), while still offering solid choices for middle of the road rock fans with new platters from Pete Yorn, the Gossip (digital only until October), the Lemonheads and Cheap Trick.

Dinosaur Jr. - Farm: J Mascis, Lou Barlow, and Murph resurrected the original band line-up in 2007 for the critically acclaimed Beyond and they have stuck with it. Leaving the majors behind for a respected indie label, Jagjaguwar, the group continues their anthemic sound, underpinned by J Mascis’ guitar hero riffs.

The Mars Volta - Octahedron: The former members of At the Drive-In continue their prog rock explorations, albeit at a lower volume and slower pace. Omar Rodríguez-López and Cedric Bixler-Zavala have both labeled the album their “acoustic” effort that, while not entirely accurate, does hint at the intent here.

by Sarah Zupko

16 Jun 2009


Blame it on a Bonnarroo hangover perhaps or the weak economy, but this week is one of the lightest new music release weeks in recent memory, rivaling the deserted graveyard that is the post holiday season. While next week promises an embarassment of indie riches, July 16th biggest highlights are a new platter from a barely known outside the indie set Americana band and a collaboration of production heavyweights Switch and Diplo. At the other end of the spectrum, the suits are pegging the week’s sales figures on a new one from the Jonas Brothers. Yeah, it’s a sad week for iTune afficiandos and big box store shoppers. That said, there are a couple of worthy re-issues on offer, with power pop legend, Big Star’s #1 Record/Radio City being at the head of the class.

Major Lazer - Guns Don’t Kill People… Lazers Do
Star remixer Diplo and M.I.A. producer Switch have teamed up for a heavily buzzed about collaboration in Major Lazer. The two creative forces merge reggae and dancehall with electronic beats and textures in a successful cross-genre experimentation. The end result is something like “digital dancehall”.

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