Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Books
The Power of the Reader in 'A History of Reading'
Alberto Manguel takes a thematic rather than linear approach to a history of reading, offering an entertaining and impassioned account of reading practices and readers' agency. [22.Oct.14]
'The Mathematician's Shiva' Is Classically Middlebrow
There are secret plots, geopolitical rumblings, high-math technical language, and a parrot of interest, but as often as not these things wanly colorize an otherwise monochromatic narrative. [22.Oct.14]
A Parable of Faith on a Desert Planet
As in Faber's previous fiction, the situation the protagonist meets in The Book of Strange New Things appears to be more complex than what this idealistic but flawed Everyman can fully comprehend. [21.Oct.14]
'The World Atlas of Street Photography' Is a Commanding Overview
Readers familiar with these artists will be happy with this representative selection, while newcomers such as myself will find much to pore over, much to enjoy and much to provoke thought. [21.Oct.14]
Eula Biss' 'On Immunity' Is a Beautiful Shot of Insight
By David L. Ulin
This elegant, intelligent book addresses not only the infections caused by viruses, but also those caused by ideas. [21.Oct.14]
Reviews
Alberto Manguel takes a thematic rather than linear approach to a history of reading, offering an entertaining and impassioned account of reading practices and readers' agency. [22.Oct.14]
There are secret plots, geopolitical rumblings, high-math technical language, and a parrot of interest, but as often as not these things wanly colorize an otherwise monochromatic narrative. [21.Oct.14]
As in Faber's previous fiction, the situation the protagonist meets in The Book of Strange New Things appears to be more complex than what this idealistic but flawed Everyman can fully comprehend. [21.Oct.14]
Readers familiar with these artists will be happy with this representative selection, while newcomers such as myself will find much to pore over, much to enjoy and much to provoke thought. [21.Oct.14]
When Flynne Fisher witnesses a murder, a contract is taken on her life. The contract holders are from the future. [20.Oct.14]
The history of the Scientific Revolution, retold: Clear, detailed, and as overwhelming as drinking from a fire hose. [19.Oct.14]
Italo Calvino offers a rarely personal, and deeply insightful, glimpse of the adolescent experience of war. [16.Oct.14]
From the first selfie to the importance of jazz musicians, Steven Johnson puts a few surprises into How We Got To Now. [16.Oct.14]
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Ian Bell
Ian Bell explores Dylan's unparalleled second act in a quintessentially American career. It's a tale of redemption, of an act of creative will against the odds, and of a writer who refused to fade away. [16.Oct.14]
By Katja Huru
Though a surface reading of Richelle Mead's Vampire Academy suggests compelling depiction of women, underneath lies ages-old patriarchal myths. [14.Oct.14]
Columns
Re:Print
Pollitt’s new book, Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights is both a call to arms and a call for honest reflection. [07.Oct.14]
The Weapon of the Future
Hip-hop appeals to those who feel powerless and disenfranchised, which is why ISIS looks to hip-hop communities as potential recruiting grounds. [06.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
My lips went mildly numb. Not dentist-visit numb, or certain illegal drugs numb. Just pleasantly numb. Comfortably numb. [10.Oct.14]
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