Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Books
Thomas Pynchon Is Still Doing What He Has Always Done, With Antic Humor and Utter Seriousnes
Is Pynchon suddenly relevant again? Has the culture's craziness finally just caught up to his penchant for conspiracy, paranoia, and crazy-named characters? [24.Oct.14]
Brian Jones: The Making of the Rolling Stones
By Paul Trynka
Brian Jones was the golden boy of the Rolling Stones—the visionary who gave the band its name and its sound. Yet he was a haunted man, and much of his brief time with the band was volatile and tragic. [24.Oct.14]
With Feeling: 'Joss Whedon: The Biography'
The only problem with the sincerely enjoyable Joss Whedon: The Biography is that we learn a heck of a lot more about his creative endeavors than we do about the geek god himself. [23.Oct.14]
'Books That Cook' Is for the Literary Foodie Whose Reading Tastes Are of a Scholarly Bent
As food studies enters academia, texts are required to populate the curricula. That doesn't mean lay readers can't enjoy them, too. [23.Oct.14]
The Power of the Reader in 'A History of Reading'
Alberto Manguel takes a thematic rather than linear approach to a history of reading, offering an entertaining and impassioned account of reading practices and readers' agency. [22.Oct.14]
Reviews
Is Pynchon suddenly relevant again? Has the culture's craziness finally just caught up to his penchant for conspiracy, paranoia, and crazy-named characters? [23.Oct.14]
The only problem with the sincerely enjoyable Joss Whedon: The Biography is that we learn a heck of a lot more about his creative endeavors than we do about the geek god himself. [23.Oct.14]
As food studies enters academia, texts are required to populate the curricula. That doesn't mean lay readers can't enjoy them, too. [22.Oct.14]
Alberto Manguel takes a thematic rather than linear approach to a history of reading, offering an entertaining and impassioned account of reading practices and readers' agency. [22.Oct.14]
There are secret plots, geopolitical rumblings, high-math technical language, and a parrot of interest, but as often as not these things wanly colorize an otherwise monochromatic narrative. [21.Oct.14]
As in Faber's previous fiction, the situation the protagonist meets in The Book of Strange New Things appears to be more complex than what this idealistic but flawed Everyman can fully comprehend. [21.Oct.14]
Readers familiar with these artists will be happy with this representative selection, while newcomers such as myself will find much to pore over, much to enjoy and much to provoke thought. [21.Oct.14]
When Flynne Fisher witnesses a murder, a contract is taken on her life. The contract holders are from the future. [20.Oct.14]
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Paul Trynka
Brian Jones was the golden boy of the Rolling Stones—the visionary who gave the band its name and its sound. Yet he was a haunted man, and much of his brief time with the band was volatile and tragic. [23.Oct.14]
By Ian Bell
Ian Bell explores Dylan's unparalleled second act in a quintessentially American career. It's a tale of redemption, of an act of creative will against the odds, and of a writer who refused to fade away. [16.Oct.14]
Columns
Re:Print
Pollitt’s new book, Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights is both a call to arms and a call for honest reflection. [07.Oct.14]
The Weapon of the Future
Hip-hop appeals to those who feel powerless and disenfranchised, which is why ISIS looks to hip-hop communities as potential recruiting grounds. [06.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
My lips went mildly numb. Not dentist-visit numb, or certain illegal drugs numb. Just pleasantly numb. Comfortably numb. [10.Oct.14]
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