Call for Feature Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Books
Cayenne Pepper Enemas and Other Developments in Early Medicine
From applying leeches to mapping the shape of the human skull, Erik Janik describes a drama of medical history in Marketplace of the Marvelous. [16.Apr.14]
Stuffed, Wired, and Eager to Please: 'Walter Potter's Curious World of Taxidermy'
Walter Potter crafted hundreds of animals, amphibians, and birds into intricately assembled Victorian dioramas for the delight of his fellow Britons. [15.Apr.14]
A 'Simulacrum of Life' in Words: Marcel Theroux's 'Strange Bodies'
In this thoughtful, entertaining novel, Marcel Theroux explores the ways in which we construct 'a workable self out of all the dissonant parts.' [14.Apr.14]
Making Sense of Nonsense and 'Assembling Flann O'Brien'
Given Brian O'Nolan and his sly guises, one must wonder what this erudite satirist makes of this posthumous tribute to his tetchy talents. [14.Apr.14]
Off Course by Michelle Huneven
If you haven't yet read a Michelle Huneven novel, what are you waiting for? [11.Apr.14]
Reviews
From applying leeches to mapping the shape of the human skull, Erik Janik describes a drama of medical history in Marketplace of the Marvelous. [15.Apr.14]
Walter Potter crafted hundreds of animals, amphibians, and birds into intricately assembled Victorian dioramas for the delight of his fellow Britons. [14.Apr.14]
In this thoughtful, entertaining novel, Marcel Theroux explores the ways in which we construct 'a workable self out of all the dissonant parts.' [14.Apr.14]
Given Brian O'Nolan and his sly guises, one must wonder what this erudite satirist makes of this posthumous tribute to his tetchy talents. [13.Apr.14]
If you haven't yet read a Michelle Huneven novel, what are you waiting for? [10.Apr.14]
At first glance, Black Moon might appear to be just another variation of the zombie theme, but it isn't: this novel is written for adults. [10.Apr.14]
In his publisher John Calder's view, Samuel Beckett retreats in his later texts, as did God from Genesis. [09.Apr.14]
Smart, stylish, and more than a little sad, Vernon Downs gives readers a lot to think about. [09.Apr.14]
News
By Hector Tobar
This is surely one of most honest, compelling and strangest books about the relationship between a writer and his subject ever penned by an American scribe. [03.Apr.14]
Features
By Matthew Algeo
In the late 1800s, America’s most popular spectator sport wasn’t baseball, boxing, or horseracing—it was competitive walking. Indeed, when a New York arena overbooked, fans rioted. [10.Apr.14]
By Kembrew McLeod
From Benjamin Franklin's hoax about the the death of his rival to Abbie Hoffman’s attempt to levitate the Pentagon to Stephen Colbert’s “news reporting”, pranksters, hoaxers, and con artists use humor to underscore larger, pointed truths about society. [03.Apr.14]
Columns
Re:Print
Hugh Fleetwood's chilling and dark mysteries deal with psychologically damaged characters, ones whose actions are usually the result of some personality disorder often undisclosed to everyone but the reader. [30.Mar.14]
Re:Print
Who will choose this enriching and rewarding removal from reality TV and manufactured distraction? Who will walk the course mapped in these heady pages, along a sobering path of self-awareness of our fragile presence surrounded by darkness and mystery? [27.Mar.14]
From The Blogs
In celebration of his 40th year as a published author, we present these five unfilmed, and five already available Stephen King books that are crying out for a cinematic (re)configuration. [09.Apr.14]
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