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Books
Another Kind of Horror: 'When Paris Went Dark'
When Paris Went Dark is a penetrating history of the anxiety, confusion, claustrophobia, and uncertainty experienced by a city in the grip of an unpredictable menace. [31.Oct.14]
What a Difference a Hair Makes
The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil feels timeless, because it contains truths you’ve known all along. [30.Oct.14]
'The Art of the English Murder': It's Not all Good Clean Fun
The second half of the19th century saw the murder rate drop precisely when "the activity of enjoying a murder became increasingly acceptable." [30.Oct.14]
Long Live the Old Flesh: David Cronenberg's 'Consumed'
Cronenberg's Consumed feels similar to that of fellow Canadian sci-fi writer William Gibson, in that the narrative is globe-hopping in nature and both writers share a fetish for technology. [29.Oct.14]
'Subversive Horror Cinema' Opens Your Eyes to Films You Thought You Knew
Aware that theories about the horror genre can turn into fanboy rants, Jon Towlson's book is almost encyclopedic in its efficient division and referential format. [29.Oct.14]
Reviews
When Paris Went Dark is a penetrating history of the anxiety, confusion, claustrophobia, and uncertainty experienced by a city in the grip of an unpredictable menace. [30.Oct.14]
The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil feels timeless, because it contains truths you’ve known all along. [30.Oct.14]
The second half of the19th century saw the murder rate drop precisely when "the activity of enjoying a murder became increasingly acceptable." [29.Oct.14]
Cronenberg's Consumed feels similar to that of fellow Canadian sci-fi writer William Gibson, in that the narrative is globe-hopping in nature and both writers share a fetish for technology. [29.Oct.14]
Aware that theories about the horror genre can turn into fanboy rants, Jon Towlson's book is almost encyclopedic in its efficient division and referential format. [28.Oct.14]
Like Neil Gaiman, China Miéville and Catherynne M. Valente, Toby Barlow takes an historic urban space and transforms it into a place to ask questions that haunt us. [28.Oct.14]
True Love Scars is a whirlwind tale of a young music fanatic’s quest for true love, high times and “the authentic real” (not necessarily in that order). [27.Oct.14]
Curtis White's arguments against the myopia of New Atheism have been made by many philosophers before him, but his alternative provides new insights into the follies of scientism. [27.Oct.14]
Mixed Media
News
By Allen Pierleoni
This week, we return to our preview of the fall book season, with a look at nonfiction titles. Biographies seem to be… [22.Oct.14]
Features
By Paul Trynka
Brian Jones was the golden boy of the Rolling Stones—the visionary who gave the band its name and its sound. Yet he was a haunted man, and much of his brief time with the band was volatile and tragic. [23.Oct.14]
By Ian Bell
Ian Bell explores Dylan's unparalleled second act in a quintessentially American career. It's a tale of redemption, of an act of creative will against the odds, and of a writer who refused to fade away. [16.Oct.14]
Columns
Negritude 2.0
The majority of Glow is a blow-by-blow account of the drugs he took and the women he bedded. James either had a great memory, or he took remarkable notes. [26.Oct.14]
Re:Print
Pollitt’s new book, Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights is both a call to arms and a call for honest reflection. [07.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
My lips went mildly numb. Not dentist-visit numb, or certain illegal drugs numb. Just pleasantly numb. Comfortably numb. [10.Oct.14]
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