Capsule Reviews

Sunday, March 11 2007

Do Make Say Think: You, Youre a History in Rust

Do Make Say Think's albums are full of glorious anthems to the inexplicable.


Woods: At Rear House

A musical ensemble must possess tremendous collective talent in order to sound rough and untutored without being trite or annoying. The new Woods CD, At


Politic Live: Adaptation

Why "preachy" works for some artists, and how a bumpin' album can make you feel like Don Cornelius.


Maps: Start Something

Based in Northampton, Maps is the one-man-band of one James Chapman, a fellow who writes pop songs with an electronic bent.  His press materials


Forty-Five: Poems by Frieda Hughes

Daughter of poets Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes faces midlife with art in Forty-Five.


Popup: Chinese Burn/Stagecoach

Far more hyper than Franz Ferdinand or Sons and Daughters, Popup have more in common with Arctic Monkeys.


Thursday, March 8 2007

Harlem Shakes: Burning Birthdays

This great EP promises even more from Brooklyn's Harlem Shakes in the near future. These guys are gonna be big.


Warm in the Wake: Gold Dust Trail

Atlanta band Warm in the Wake is a perfect cross of Wilco, The Shins and Sparklehorse.


Panda Bear / Excepter: Carrots / KKKKK split 12

Consider this an orange juice and mogadon cocktail.


Various Artists: Presence Under the Tree

Presence Under the Tree is a double-CD collection of starry-eyed, dreampoppy, vaguely folkish indie, one disc labelled Twilight (the more robust) and the other Starlight


This Unique Museum: A Collection of Short Stories

A collection of musical short stories combining acoustic guitar with electronic effects.


Wednesday, March 7 2007

Black Milk: Popular Demand

Maybe the city influences the music. Maybe the music is indicative of the city. Either way, Black Milk may become the pride of Detroit, Michigan.


Hug: Heroes

Hug: should sound pretty warm, right? Producer John Dahlbäck’s fuzzy pseudonym had me fearing that Heroes would be one of those folktronic cuddlecore


Prosser: Prosser

The project of Eric Woodruff, former of Delay, is a spacey rock-meets-Americana album that meanders from one very good song to another. Although there are


Citizens Here and Abroad: Waving, Not Drowning Citizens

With Waving, Not Drowning, Citizens Here and Abroad suffer a lack of distinction. Impeded by an unpalatable homogeneity, the album fails to distinguish the band


Eamonn Coyne and Kris Drever: Honk Toot Suite

Eamonn Coyne and Kris Drever aren’t knee-deep in either Celtic music or bluegrass, but instead weave a nice and nifty combination of the two.


Tuesday, March 6 2007

The Roches: Moonswept

The three Roche sisters possess lovely voices and the ability to create stunning vocal harmonies that just take one's breath away.


Huntsville: For the Middle Class

Serene but inventive drone-based music from improvisation-minded Norwegians.


The Summer Wardrobe: The Summer Wardrobe

Like Texan psychedelic pioneers the 13th Floor Elevators, Austin-based band the Summer Wardrobe enjoy melding traditional country instruments into a heady brew of trippy cerebral


The Elders: Racing the Tide

When people think of Celtic rock, they often think of the Waterboys or the Pogues. The Elders, with lead singer (and Irishman) Ian Bryne at


//Blogs

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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