Columns

Wednesday, April 26 2017

Massive Illusions: A Look Back at Gazpacho’s ‘Night’ With Keyboardist Thomas Andersen

Ten years later, Gazpacho's fourth LP, Night, remains the group's best representation of isolation, reflection, and yearning.


Joy Kogawa’s Latest Asks: Is There a Limit to Our Capacity to Forgive?

From the atomic bombing of Nagasaki to her father's pedophilia, Kogawa embarks on a brutally honest and personal exploration of the nature of guilt and forgiveness.


Thursday, April 20 2017

Detachment and Re-attachment: The Mind of a Hermit No More

Christopher Knight disappeared into the woods at the age of 20 and returned at 47 without a masterpiece, without a testimony of life’s greater purpose, without anything profound to convey.


Wednesday, April 19 2017

What Defines the Line Between Inclusivity and Queerbaiting?

It was the year of the African American, not the LGBTQ, at the Academy Awards -- we can't have both. Perhaps the new hashtag should be #Oscarsoblackandwhite.


Tuesday, April 18 2017

Istanbul: From Emperors to Street Vendors

Historian Thomas F. Madden's Istanbul leaves one with a sense of awe for how much of the human experience is on display in this one city, in this part of the world.


Eleven Madison Park vs Alinea: The Ultimate Restaurant Grudge Match

On the comparative merits of Eleven Madison Park versus Alinea, on the occasion of Eleven Madison Park being named the best restaurant in the world.


Monday, April 17 2017

Can We Say the F Word Yet? On Fascism and Humor

In light of the decrees and executive orders signed thus far by Donald Trump, we might reasonably ask: is fascism relevant to America's current political state?


Authenticity and Unbroken Chains in Rick Massimo’s ‘I Got a Song’

This book is about true believers who kept the torch burning for “authenticity” in folk music at any cost; even if it meant cultural appropriation and commercial compromising.


Friday, April 14 2017

‘About Time’ Is the Donald Trump of Romantic Comedies

About Time professes to celebrate life, but instead celebrates perhaps the most narcissistic, selfish behaviour ever rendered in film.


Thursday, April 13 2017

In Praise of Comedy Films That Aren’t Funny

A look at the rather funnily not funny films, Blast-Off and Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood.


Wednesday, April 12 2017

Alfred Hitchcock May Be a Moralist, but He Does Not Moralize

Hitchcock’s Moral Gaze argues that Hitchcock examined the darkest edges of his characters to help his audience understand their connection with the act of watching, gazing, and sometimes not connecting.


Tuesday, April 11 2017

On ‘The Singing Detective’ and the Horrors of Tin Pan Alley

How Dennis Potter's 1986 BBC-TV masterpiece The Singing Detective still resonates in the new Golden Age of TV.


Monday, April 10 2017

Broadway’s ‘The Play that Goes Wrong’ Is More Tiresome Than Winsome

The Play That Goes Wrong aims for oversized laughs via an outlandish caricature of a murder-mystery performed within.


What Can Today’s Activists Learn From the Vietnam Anti-war Movement?

The lessons of the Vietnam peace movement are at risk of being distorted and forgotten, argues one of its founding voices.


Friday, April 7 2017

The Beautiful Game in the Time of Tyranny

What a Brazilian football player who taught a nation how to fight dictatorship can teach us in the Age of Trump.


Wednesday, April 5 2017

The Personal Find: Bill Doggett’s “Honky Tonk Parts 1 & 2”

A jump blues song that sold over a million copies was nowhere on my sonic horizon until I discovered it in a dusty box at the back of a thrift store.


Tuesday, April 4 2017

Can You Believe It?: The ‘No Such Thing As a Fish’ Podcast

The researchers behind BBC's QI emerge from behind the scenes to inform, entertain and tease via their award-winning podcast, No Such Thing As a Fish.


Monday, April 3 2017

Lana Del Rey’s “Love” in the Era of Trump

"Love" makes me wonder if we've misheard Del Rey's use of nostalgia, mistaking it for the rose-colored (and heart-shaped) variety when instead it produces a fog.


Wednesday, March 29 2017

Tina Turner Got It Right: We Don’t Need More Heroes

Jordan Flaherty's No More Heroes argues that the greatest danger to progressive movements often comes from within.


Friday, March 24 2017

The Microscopic Septet: Pioneers Across Jazz Boundaries

In the '80s, "The Micros" mixed tradition and avant-garde jazz with impunity and almost got famous doing it. Today they're just playing the blues.


//Mixed media
//Blogs

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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