Columns

Friday, September 30 2016

A Melancholic Way of Knowing

Melancholy, in its deepest truth, is not bereft of hope but rather relies upon it.


Thursday, September 29 2016

The Mexican Journey That Made One of the 20th Century’s Finest Writers

Sybille Bedford's account of her remarkable year in Mexico is the perfect introduction to one of the 20th century's most remarkable writers.


Monday, September 26 2016

Mourning in America: Remembering ‘Twin Peaks’

Frustrating expectations was part of Twin Peaks modus operandi.


Thursday, September 22 2016

Make It Quick: The Art of the One-liner

Some may dismiss the one-liner as an easy gag, but a good one requires real skill. Luckily, there are comedians out there who have mastered the art.


On Very Visceral Mysteries: ‘The Woman in Cabin 10’

Much of what happens to the protagonists here and in the comparable The Girl on the Train evades their control.


Wednesday, September 21 2016

Tuesday, September 20 2016

‘Inside’ the Lie of Ambiguity

Inside is too literal to be expressionistic, but too vague to be a narrative. It's so ambiguous that it fails to be anything.


Thursday, September 15 2016

Domestic Infelicity: ‘Way Out’ Is Lost and Found on YouTube

Roald Dahl's short-lived anthology feels like a merging of Rod Serling's horror and sci-fi with Alfred Hitchcock's obsession with unhappy marriages.


Wednesday, September 14 2016

Let the Critics Out of the Closet

Anonymity turns restaurant critics into some kind of stealthy ninja with a distant or even adversarial stance, and this benefits no one.


Tuesday, September 13 2016

The Long, Hot Summer of 2016: How We Got Over

Simone Manuel’s winning a gold medal in this particular Olympic swimming event in this particular summer gave the especially besieged among us a chance to take a break from the siege.


Friday, September 9 2016

Question Everything, Especially If You Believe in It: An Interview With Stuart Jeffries

It’s difficult to imagine today’s neoliberal universities producing anything remotely like critical theory, or even a school of thought that substantively challenges prevailing intellectual paradigms.


Thursday, September 8 2016

Taking the Bitter With the Swede: Adam Tensta’s Moody Hip-Hop Soul

One of Sweden's most outspoken and celebrated rappers returns with an album of eerie hip-hop noir, where the heavy grooves luxuriate in the nebulous fog of despair.


Wednesday, September 7 2016

At Last, a Sober and Punk Rendering of Bruce Springsteen’s Life and Work

Boss is a solid book because the firm, understated power of Gillian Gaar’s gutter feminist voice cuts through all that glitters around Springsteen.


Friday, September 2 2016

The Sustaining Lure of the Paris Commune

Today's equivalent to the Paris Commune is a New York in which Zucotti Park did not merely occupy Wall Street but burned it to the ground, hung the bankers, and opened the borders.


Wednesday, August 31 2016

On the Real Altamont and the Fake Rolling Stones

Joel Selvin’s new book digs deep into the seventh circle of rock music’s hell.


Monday, August 29 2016

Entering the Void: A Reflection on Beardfish

Beardfish may've broken up, but they left us with one of the most humorous, colorful, intricate, and distinctive discographies in all of progressive rock.


Thursday, August 25 2016

The New Oral History: Chris Shiflett and Steve Dawson’s Smart, Listenable Podcasts

There are more podcasts than you can shake a flash drive at these days. Though the number of 'casts that embrace Americana music is growing, these two stand out.


Friday, August 19 2016

The Hunted and the Haunted in ‘King Stakh’s Wild Hunt’

Deeply baroque and shamelessly foreboding, Uladzimir Karatkevich’s King Stakh’s Wild Hunt is a crowning achievement of Belarusian gothic.


Wednesday, August 17 2016

The Dangers of Playing in Unfinished Houses: Considering Early Access Video Games

Playing a game in its alpha or beta form is like living in an unfinished house; it's habitable, but some things seem off or don't work or might get better (or worse).


Tuesday, August 16 2016

The Dark Side of the Modern Olympics

The Olympic Games have been avid partners with society’s reactionaries: patriarchal men, white colonial elites, fascist politicians, and now neoliberal corporations.


//Mixed media
//Blogs

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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