Columns

Sunday, August 12 2007

The Lost in Translation Generation

Americans Need to Learn English…British English, that is!


Thursday, August 9 2007

A Critic’s Grab-Bag

The most rewarding work as a critic is not in evaluating the flow of big menu items from established artists, but in sampling the little dishes that come along -- like this quartet of obscure, interesting stuff from 2007's first half.


Wednesday, August 8 2007

Hey, You Got Your Ghost in My Machine!

The body and the machine are born innocent. It’s the soul and the mind that make them dirty and evil. A philosophical meandering into America's obsession with automobiles.


Tuesday, August 7 2007

The Sounds of Now: Steve Reich and the Transmogrification of the Banal

As human beings, interpretive animals that attempt to navigate the world by coming to some sort of "understanding" of it, we are addicted to purpose.


Monday, August 6 2007

Xtreme Zoo Babies

National Geographic's Animals in the Womb brings up an interesting thought; nobody goes around aborting cute, unborn puppies -- we wait until they're born to get rid of them.


Sunday, August 5 2007

The Evolution of Africa and Hip-Hop

Pharoahe Monch's new album, Desire, is a complete surround-sense experience, but it's also a reminder that as much as our technologies have improved, what we are communicating is not necessarily the most righteous of information.


By the Power of Softcore

One Man's Daring Look Back at He-Man and the Masters of the Universe… and Porky's


Thursday, August 2 2007

Delfin Quishpe: Ecuador’s Unlikely YouTube Celebrity

Other than cute animal photos and pornography, the content that enjoys the most popularity on the Internet often has a link to real-world events of generalized significance – like Quishpe's 9/11 video.


Pop Culture in 17 Syllables

In our brave new world of news bytes, instant messaging and dwindling attention spans, the haiku is making a comeback.


Wednesday, August 1 2007

In Orario: How to Be In Time in Italy

One could easily go hungry for lack of planning in certain parts of Italy. Best to learn the Italian concept of time if you want to survive here.


Tuesday, July 31 2007

Giant Catfish…Only a Noodle Away

Catfish are strong, eccentric characters that have for many years snubbed their bottom-feeding whiskered noses at the angling establishment. But still, they're suckers for a wiggling finger.


Monday, July 30 2007

Out in the Cold

HotHouse, a non-profit arts center in Chicago, embodied how beneficial a commitment to the arts could be, and surely this would override any business issues, I thought. I thought wrong.


Sunday, July 29 2007

The NAACP’s Mock Burial of Its Relevance

Our enemy is not the "N-word" itself; it’s whatever propels people to use it. We need healers, not language nannies.


Thursday, July 26 2007

A ‘Head’ of Its Time

In Head, a frighteningly original, career-defying work, The Monkees depict how they were forever trapped in a suffocating, inescapable situation.


Wednesday, July 25 2007

Who’s Doggin’ Who?

In the land of designer pet collars, pet cemeteries, even pet-themed restaurants and bakeries, dogfighting has reared its ugly head.


Tuesday, July 24 2007

Direct from the Speedy Streets of London

Reports of the Tour De France’s death have been greatly exaggerated. London's million-strong crowd was unrelentingly optimistic about the race and its future.


Monday, July 23 2007

Digesting The Raw Shark Texts

Words, these fundaments of culture and personal expression, these phonic constructions, which are so closely linked to human emotion and identity, have a profound destructive capacity.


Sunday, July 22 2007

Resurrections

The co-founder of the maverick reissue label the Numero Group talks about seeking out the eccentric, saving the unknown, and releasing only what you love.


Thursday, July 19 2007

Now, Check the Method

Brian Coleman's new book on classic hip-hop albums and Saigon's public rant offer rare behind-the-scenes glimpse of hip-hop's creative process.


The Profound Consolation: The Use of Bach’s Music in the Films of Ingmar Bergman (Part 4)

The music in Bergman's Saraband sets up numerous tensions that it never reconciles: listener and performer, individual and group, passive aestheticism and practical enactment. Music in Bergman's world offers hope, but it does not offer answers.


//Mixed media
//Blogs

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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