Tuesday, June 21 2016

‘The Hunger Games’: The Writer’s Cut Really Is Better (Sponsored Article)

Even if you've seen The Hunger Games films dozens of times, the books will reveal character complexities that were left out of the film adaptations.

Why Is Opera So Derided in America?

Prokofiev's The Fiery Angel offers everything movie goers seek: debauchery, religious obsession, exorcisms, devilish abuses, graphic sexual assault, and a variety of horrific effects both musical and visual.

Monday, June 20 2016

Ralph Fiennes and Vanessa Redgrave Re-team in the Almeida’s Excellent ‘Richard III&#8217

Rupert Goold’s spare, intense production divests Richard III of any pantomime associations and boasts an astounding performance from Ralph Fiennes as the treacherous monarch.

Who’s Better Than Mark Twain at Bible-bashing?

Sounding more like Christopher Hitchens than a lapsed Presbyterian from the 19th century, Mark Twain rips apart Testaments Old and New.

Friday, June 17 2016

‘Someone Else’ Director Nelson Kim on the Fluidity of Identity

"The puzzle, or mindfuck film, if you will, is an inherently cinematic idea. Something about the very nature of cinema invites playing around with different levels of reality."

UCLA Film & Television Archive to the Rescue

The Chase, Too Late for Tears, Woman on the Run and The Southerner are all examples of postwar indie cinema that had fallen through the cracks -- until now.

Thursday, June 16 2016

Packing Bags and Hittin’ the Road: A Look Back on Music Gatherings of Yore

Remember when Mumford and Sons spent their pre-show hours swinging from tires in a lake crowded with fans?

Wednesday, June 15 2016

Flea-Market Music: On the Glorious Cacophony of The Felice Brothers

Their style is loose, but not without form; cluttered, though sometimes spare; common, but not ordinary; discounted, but not cheap; public, but out-of-the-way; historical, but liable to disappear at any moment.

‘The Restless Clock’ Will Have You Pondering the Matter of Matter

History of science professor Dr. Jessica Riskin examines how we banished agency from the science of living things.

Monday, June 13 2016

Isabelle Huppert Unites the Diverse Strands of Warlikowski’s ‘Phaedra(s)’

Krzysztof Warlikowski’s characteristically idiosyncratic production reflects on the legend and legacy of Phaedra as icon – and draws much of its interest from Isabelle Huppert as icon.

Friday, June 10 2016

An Anatomical Dissection of Calvino’s ‘If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler’

Postmodernism seeks to disrupt the grand narrative, and expose the artifice of writing. Dissected, its innards revealed, this resembles geometry.

Helen McCrory Captivates in the National Theatre’s Revival of ‘The Deep Blue Sea’

Carrie Cracknell delivers a beautiful, sensitive and measured production of the Terence Rattigan masterpiece.

Thursday, June 9 2016

What’s ‘Love’ Got to Do With it? Why Do Audiences Reject Sex in the Movies?

Gaspar Noé’s Love was panned in many different parts of the world because its unsimulated sex scenes defy narrative norms and take moviegoers out of the story.

Teen Manga Tackle Tough Topics

From deafness to gender identity, teen manga offer rewarding and complex treatments of fraught issues.

Tuesday, June 7 2016

Muhammad Ali and the Day Fans Pelted the Ring With Trash

In his new book, Ali vs. Inoki, Josh Gross untangles the complicated history of the 1976 meeting of two legends -- and a failed experiment.

Perhaps Prince Really Did Die 4 Us

On what would have been the groundbreaking musician's 58th birthday, a reflection on his final chord.

Monday, June 6 2016

Marrow of Their Spirits: A Reflection on Agalloch

Agalloch regularly melded metaphysical ponderings into its light-and-dark sonic tapestries, yielding a catalog that’s as enticing intellectually as it is musically.

Friday, June 3 2016

Faintly Androgynous and Pathologically Disturbed

Montgomery Clift and Clifton Webb were both gay actors. One embraced his sexuality, while the other denied it, which made a huge difference in how their careers played out.

Island Life: Alexi Kaye Campbell’s ‘Sunset at the Villa Thalia’, National Theatre

Personal and political tensions surface between two couples in Alexi Kaye Campbell’s absorbing Skiathos-set play at the National Theatre.

Wednesday, June 1 2016

Sexing Up Brecht: The National Theatre’s New Version of ‘The Threepenny Opera’

Some fine performances bring Brechtian bite to Rufus Norris’s otherwise disappointing new production of The Threepenny Opera.

//Mixed media

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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