Columns > Culture

Monday, September 18 2017

Never Settle, Never Rest on Your Laurels: Activist Catherine Hernandez on Her Book, ‘Scarborough’

Theatre practitioner Catherine Hernandez reveals the complexity of representation and responsibility in writing fiction.


Tuesday, September 5 2017

Mints Rule by Fear But Bonbons Do Not

Forget fresh breath, bonbons breed bon mots.


Monday, August 21 2017

Sabahattin Ali’s ‘Madonna in a Fur Coat’: The Turkish Novel That Refuses to Die

Maureen Freely, president of English PEN, talks with PopMatters about this slim, decades-old romance that has emerged as a symbol of resistance in the face of brutal state repression.


Wednesday, August 16 2017

“To Penetrate the Fug of Things”: On Trump’s Response to Charlottesville

Rationality, in the moral sense, is an act of love because it is an attempt to bring the world closer, not drive it away. Rationality is not an inherent human trait, it is a choice.


Tuesday, August 15 2017

Dancing the Tango Through Mao’s Cultural Revolution With Argentinian Pancho and His Orchestra

On Shanghai dance halls of the late '30s and a vinyl tango artifact that survived Mao’s Cultural Revolution.


Tuesday, August 8 2017

You May Be Black or You May Be White But in Africa You’re an American First

David Peterson del Mar explores a creation myth for a nation of black people still searching for personal and collective terra firma.


Monday, August 7 2017

Lost Chords, Major Chords, Minor Chords, Dissonant Counter-melodies: ‘Dreaming the Beatles’

This biography of the Beatles illustrates how their personality dynamics served as both a necessary elixir and an addictive poison in the creation of their music.


Friday, August 4 2017

Remembering (and Reliving) the Bombing of Hiroshima With Keiji Nakazawa’s ‘Barefoot Gen’

The seminal manga of Hiroshima's atomic bombing and aftermath remains an essential reminder of the horrors of war and atomic bombs.


Wednesday, August 2 2017

Small Beauty, Big Ideas: A Conversation with Lambda Award Winner Jia Qing Wilson-Yang

‘Best Transgender Fiction’ winner’s work challenges Can-Lit and the representation of identity.


Monday, July 31 2017

On ‘Art Sex Music’ and Working as an Avant-Garde Artist With Genesis P-Orridge

Throbbing Gristle and COUM Transmissions' Cosey Fanni Tutti's autobiography reminds us that the destructive forces of misogyny and exploitation infiltrate even the most admired of forward-thinking movements.


Thursday, July 27 2017

How to Ruin a University Without Really Trying

As Stefan Collini discusses in Speaking of Universities, none of the things universities aim to do -- from educating people to achieving research breakthroughs -- can be achieved under the conditions they’re increasingly being made to conform to.


Tuesday, July 25 2017

The Teddy Charles/Teddy Cohen Jazz Map of Random Finds and Significant Directions

I take a chance on the unknown used records of Shenzhen and Los Angeles and unwittingly connect the dots, opening up the wide but previously obscured vistas of post-bebop history.


Wednesday, July 19 2017

Everything Was Fake: ‘Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris’

In the wake of the 'Terrible Year', Flaubert railed against the "stupidity" of his fellow citizens. Are we any smarter 150 years later?


Tuesday, July 18 2017

Our Times of Political Turmoil and Upheaval Call for Grace Paley’s Astute Criticism

A Grace Paley Reader is a powerful, captivating, and extremely relevant survey of Paley’s work from the field. It's a fine example of the personal as political.


Monday, July 17 2017

Algiers and the Political Structures of Noise

How can there be a political movement if we're unwilling to move? Algiers connects past and present for the sake of the future.


Poetry, Art, and the New Spirit of Capitalism

Poet and critic Jasper Bernes seeks nothing less than a complete reconsideration of poetry and art over the past 50 years in this book, which heralds the appearance of an important new voice in criticism.


Monday, June 26 2017

China Mieville’s ‘October’: The Bolsheviks Are Back in Vogue

What was the secret of the Russian Revolution? What lessons -- both positive and negative -- does it hold for the present day?


Friday, June 23 2017

From Amar Akbar Anthony to Baahubali: Whither Indian Cinema’s Secularism?

A retrospective of Manmohan Desai’s Bollywood classic Amar Akbar Anthony, and the films it has influenced, 40 years on.


Tuesday, June 20 2017

‘Flavor’: It’s Not on the Tip of Your Tongue

Do you think cilantro tastes like soap? Do you ever get a hit of barnyard off a fine Bordeaux? Flavor will end up taking wine snobs down a peg while lifting up everyone else.


Monday, June 19 2017

Life in the Time of Outrage: We’ve Drawn So Many Lines in the Sand That We’ve Eroded the Beach

The ad hominem argument, traditionally considered a logical fallacy, has gained a cultural acceptance and a widespread tacit approval that boggles the mind.


//Mixed media

//Blogs

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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