Columns > Theatre

Tuesday, October 6 2015

Edouard Bourdet’s Lesbian Play, ‘The Captive’, Was Certainly Captive of its Time

Alison Bechdel's Fun Home isn't the first lesbian themed work of art to garner acclaim and controversy; 90 years ago, The Captive set the precedent.

Thursday, July 9 2015

The Thunderbolt of Change: ‘Angels in America’ and the Marriage Equality Victory

Complicated, fabulous and deeply progressive, Angels in America may be more pressing and relevant in the time of SCOTUS' decision on marriage equality than it was during the height of the AIDS crises.

Friday, February 27 2015

The Hays Code Nightmare Has Come True. Ain’t That Grand?

The '30s era Hays Code limited significantly what artists could express and what audiences could see. Today's LGBT media has blasted through all that.

Wednesday, December 3 2014

The Politics of Performance: Reverend Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping

Like many avant-gardists before them, Reverend Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping view their performances not as an artistic practice or profession, but as an orientation toward life.

Wednesday, April 3 2013

A Cirque Du Soleil Performance in Hollywood Evokes Memories of the Circus of Hollywood

What do Dracula, The Pink Panther, Rocky Horror, The Exorcist, Thomas Edison and Danny Elfman have to do with Cirque Du Soleil? The Next Reel explores the 'Two Billion Nickelodeon'.

Wednesday, October 24 2012

In Praise of Black Minstrelsy’s Happy Darkies on Parade

Is black minstrelsy a celebration of noxious stereotypes or an important part of American culture? Or both?

Thursday, December 15 2011

O Captain! My Captain! Going Where No Octogenarian Has Gone Before

As "Bill" explores the meaninglessness of celebrity, "Shatner" embraces the shallow and the superficial like an Andy Warhol soup can come to life.

Monday, July 25 2011

Voluntary Amnesia in ‘Dollhouse’ and ‘Pygmalion’

Long before Dollhouse's Echo submitted herself to five years of memory loss, Eliza Doolitle of Pygmalion experimented with some personal tabula rasa.

Monday, January 31 2011

Que Pasa, New York?

How do artists get their work done in other cities of the world? Where is it viable to live? It's probably silly to begin our investigation in New York. Just 30 years ago, New York was still opening its arms to the tired, poor, huddled masses of creatives. But now?

Thursday, October 29 2009

Can Tyler Perry’s ‘For Colored Girls’ Resurrect BAM?

Film adaptations from black masterpieces -- and the Chitlin Circuit -- are rejuvenating America's Black Arts Movement.

Thursday, September 3 2009

Ride This Time Machine Down a Road Less Traveled

Jump into that ’59 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz with the maxed-out tailfins, contemplate what an original Barbie doll could fetch on eBay, and enjoy this roll call of Reasons Why Everything Changed in 1959.

Thursday, April 30 2009

Like Movies—with Buttons

Like Edwin S. Porter realizing that a series of shots was how you structured a film, games have to abandon the presumption that they need to obey a linear narrative or controlled message and just let the player loose.

Thursday, December 4 2008

Frost/Nixon: An Interview with a Vampire

Frank Langella seethes and pulsates with cunning as the deposed president in 'Frost/Nixon', a far cry from the grinning cowboy executive Josh Brolin presented in 'W'.

Sunday, June 18 2006

And Baby Makes a Mess

In which Sandra Oh inadvertently scares our columnist to death in a new play that's 'like birth control'.

Monday, April 24 2006

In Sickness and in Health

In Well, Lisa Kron asks, what is the difference between the healthy and the ill? And also, why does my mom keep fucking up my play?

Wednesday, March 29 2006

Double Hedda

In New York, Henrik Ibsen's centennial is celebrated with a knockout showdown: It's Cate Blanchett vs. the robots, for the soul of Hedda Gabler.

Thursday, March 2 2006

Keeping the Line Between the Past and the Present

Pulitzer Prize-winner Doug Wright talks to Performance Oriented about his new stage adaptation of Grey Gardens; or, How to Make 'Morbid Eccentrics' Sing and Dance.

Sunday, January 29 2006

Peanuts Brittle

In Royal's theatrical adaptation of the Peanuts cartoon strip, Charlie Brown and the gang have grow older, been through some hard times. It's sometimes funny, sometimes morbid. But like it's one-dimensional inspiration, it never manages to get 'real'.

//Mixed media

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

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