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Between the Buried and Me

The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues

(Metal Blade)

Review [20.Apr.2011]

10


Between the Buried and Me
The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues


Portentous and epic as only a progressive metal band could be, Between the Buried and Me cram into 30 minutes what it takes most prog metal bands over an hour to do. Just as the band did on its previous two records, 2007’s Colors and 2009’s The Great Misdirect, Between the Buried and Me manages to include all sorts of musical ideas into its consistently brutal metal sound, ranging from dark contemporary classical to polka, sometimes within the course of one song. As a whole, the record isn’t anything particularly new for the band, but the incredible songwriting and musicianship evident in every second of this record never ceases to amaze. Given that this short album is the first of two parts of a concept record, this is a promising beginning to what will hopefully be something quite grand in the end. Brice Ezell


 

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Becoming the Archetype

Celestial Completion

(Solid State)

Review [25.Jul.2011]

9


Becoming the Archetype
Celestial Completion


It has always puzzled me how there are Christians who want to bring across their religious beliefs/opinions through the aggression of metal music. So here we have another bunch of ‘em joining the fray—but with much crazier genre-crossings than your average Christcore band. Trying to describe them with conventional subgenres fails (which is a pretty amazing feat in today’s ocean of subgenres), and the closest I arrived at was “progressive death metalcore”. I don’t know if Jesus really keeps an ear out for these guys as much as Hillsong in his cozy kingdom upstairs, but, even if he doesn’t, I feel your love, guys. Dane Prokofiev


 

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Obscura

Omnivium

(Relapse)

Review [17.Apr.2011]

8


Obscura
Omnivium


Obscura are very obviously huge fans of sci-fi. ALL of their album covers to date have featured some kind of alien object juxtaposed against some kind of epic and apocalyptic-looking background, and this time, we’ve got a…er, three-tentacled jellyfish with an extremely large head? It looks like it is turning green because of consuming that very obviously toxic-looking egg with its lower half glowing a luminous green, too. Well, this German quartet is as technical as any standard sci-fi story can get, and they also have a penchant for imaginative tunes of astronomically epic proportions. Seems like the imagery suits them. Dane Prokofiev


 

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The Atlas Moth

An Ache for the Distance

(Profound Lore)

7


The Atlas Moth
An Ache for the Distance


With a sound that dips into so many different styles of metal at the same time—sludge, psychedelic, doom, black—it’s remarkable how far the Chicago band has come in such short time. Interestingly, it’s the influence of jazz and blues that makes this second album so engaging, the band lending its new tracks a swing and groove that, coupled with the hypnotic vocals of guitarists Stavros Giannopoulos and David Kush, make tracks like “Holes in the Desert”, “Perpetual Generations”, and the title track some of the more original-sounding American metal we’ve heard in the past year. Adrien Begrand


 

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Leviathan

True Traitor, True Whore

(Profound Lore)

6


Leviathan
True Traitor, True Whore


Controversial, and befouled before its release, True Traitor, True Whore was deemed untouchable by many after Leviathan frontman Wrest was arrested for an atrocious crime in ‘11. The album serves as a reminder of unsettling horrors: In a burst of caustic energy following his arrest, Wrest blended a diverse set of black metal, gothic, and post-punk influences to craft a claustrophobic suite of erratic, volatile, and nightmarish tracks. Tendentious, uncompromising, and undeniably challenging, True Traitor, True Whore retains the perversity of black metal, but is more structurally and philosophically akin to the most intransigent noise artists. Craig Hayes


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